Body Preservation: Pannekoeken (aka Dutch Baby) a cheap & easy 5-ingredient, 5-step, recipe

This is what I know as a pannekoeken, or a Dutch Baby.

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From just pantry staples (eggs, milk, flour, salt and butter) and a couple of special techniques, it is possible to create an exciting, tasty, light-but-filling, comfort-food, meal that will appeal to even picky eaters.

Scroll down for illustrated step-by-step instructions, and printable recipe.

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My most recent pannekoeken:

Last month, my son and I left Minnesota and visited my daughter and her beau in North Carolina. Though we ate out often during the vacation (so we Yankees could sample some local cuisine) my daughter asked me to make a few recipes from home. One dish she requested was pannekoeken.

As far as I can tell, this is a very Minnesotan thing to eat.

Of course, The Beau, a native North Carolinian, had never heard of it. He was game to try it though.

Pannekoeken What am I eating

When the pannekoeken came out of the oven, he wasn’t sure what to think. He asked my son to snap the above photograph. Even before tasting it, he posted the pic to his Facebook, captioned with the question, “What am I eating?” His friends thought maybe it was Yorkshire Pudding or Bubble and Squeak. (Until they made these good guesses, it hadn’t occurred to me that it was similar to those recipes.)

Once The Beau figured out how* to eat it, he really liked it … according to him, it was possibly better than regular pancakes.

(*Honestly, IMHO, the best way to eat a pannekoeken is to slather it with jelly (the way my son and husband like it) or with lots of butter (the way my daughter and I like it), then pick it up, fold it over and eat it like some kind of weird Minnesota taco. The Beau seemed to enjoy it with butter and syrup, which did make it messier to eat. I guess it could be consumed with the help of a knife and fork, but it’s not as much fun.)

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Is it really a pannekoeken?

As I was getting this post ready, I did my due diligence and googled the word. I have to tell you that either Wikipedia or I have it wrong. The listing at Wikipedia shows a picture of something that looks more like a pancake or crepe. It appears that one would eat several of them at a sitting, in the same way that most folks would eat a stack of flapjacks. One of these pancake-like things would be called a “pannekoek” or a “pannenkoek” with “pannekoken” reserved for the plural.

Whatever.

The following recipe makes something entirely different. Judging by looks alone, my version of pannekoeken is better. And I guarantee that it’s more fun.

(I’m also pretty sure that no one could eat more than one. My 18-year old, six foot, son can eat a whole one, but only barely.)

MAKING THE PANNEKOEKEN:

Here’s what you need:
4 eggs
1 cup milk
1 cup flour
1/2 teaspoon salt
2 tablespoons butter

(It’s even an easy-to-memorize recipe.)

also:
an oven
a measuring cup
a blender (or a strong arm and a whisk)
a 12 inch cast iron pan
OR
a Pyrex glass 2 quart (9″ X 12″) rectangular baking pan

Click here for printable PDF of recipe.

(But read through complete instructions below for additional tips.)

Making a successful pannekoeken is all in the techniques you use.

Here’s how you do it:

Step 1) For each pannekoeken you want to make, measure 1 cup milk into a container and add four eggs. (As you can see, the milk and eggs together measures about two cups.) Let come to room temperature. (At least 1 hour.)

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Step 2) Preheat oven to 425 degrees. Depending on your oven this may take a while. The oven MUST be hot, so the batter will be shocked into trying to climb out of the pan.

You will need to preheat the cooking pan and the butter too, but you do that after the oven has reached the proper temperature. I preheat my oven for about 20 minutes then put my cast iron pan into the hot oven about 10 minutes before I want to start the baking. In the last 2-3 minutes of the preheating time, you will add the 2 tablespoons of butter to the hot cast iron pan so that it melts completely and starts to bubble. NOTE: If you are using the Pyrex dish, you will put the pan and butter into the oven at the same time and heat just just until the butter melts completely and starts to bubble.

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Step 3) Blend the milk and eggs. Add two generous pinches of salt (1/2 teaspoon or a little more) to the whirring mixture, then introduce 1 cup flour, reasonably slowly. (Don’t fret about it, just don’t dump it in all at once.) You are looking to create a thin, bubbly batter. It only takes a minute or two, so I do this while the butter is melting. That way the batter is still airy when I pour it it into the pan.

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Step 4) When the oven, pan and butter are hot, pour the batter into the pan quickly. You don’t want to let a lot of the heat escape in this process. I pull out the shelf using an oven mitt, pour the batter directly from the blender into the pan, slide the shelf back, and close the door.

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Bake the pannekoeken for 18-25 minutes. Do not open the door for at least 15 minutes, and if you are checking for doneness after that, do it gently, opening the door as little as possible. After 18-20 minutes, the pannekoeken will be cooked through, puffed up,  crispy on the outside and egg-y on the inside, and browning at the edges.

2011-11-17 Dutch baby pancake in glass pan

If you let it go a bit longer, it will brown more, and the exterior will crisp more. It’s a matter of taste which way you prefer it. (It’s unlikely you will want to cook it for more than 25 minutes.)

It will be very puffy! Likely it will have risen well above the edge of the pan.

Once it is removed from the oven, the pannekoeken will immediately start falling in the middle. There’s nothing you can do to stop it.

Step 5) Serve. When you remove the pan from the oven, and when you are taking the pannekoeken out of the pan, it is VERY IMPORTANT that you remember the cooking pan is VERY HOT. It’s best to use a thick oven mitt and a silicon or metal spatula while removing the pannekoeken from its pan.

(Why, yes, I have grabbed that smoking-hot handle bare-handed while trying to serve the pannekoeken. Once.)

If you used enough butter for your pan, it will come out easily, after you run your spatula around the edges to separate it from the pan. If it doesn’t come out cleanly, thoroughly scrape out any stuck-on bits and use a little more butter for subsequent pannekoeken.

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Top your pannekoeken with whatever you like on pancakes.

  • Suggestions:
  • Butter
  • Jelly or Preserves
  • Syrup
  • Cinnamon & Sugar
  • Warmed Pie Filling

I suppose one pannekoeken, prepared according to recipe, should probably serve 4. (I can do half of one, sometimes a little more.) According to an online recipe calorie calculator, a whole pannekoeken is about 1,100 calories. One fourth of one would be about 275 calories. Of course that’s before you top it with anything.

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  • This is one recipe in a growing collection of  foods in the Body Preservation section if this blog.
  • Pannekoeken is listed under the category “Food for Writers / Artists / Other Obsessives.” It could just as well have been archived as a “Getting Away With It Food.”
  • For more recipes, and other paranormal lifestyle tips, please visit:
body preservation

Click the Pic to go to Body Preservation


The Conjuring: facts & the fallout, one year later.

On the anniversary of the release of The Conjuring, (which is one of my picks for the 13 most haunting films for ghost story lovers,) I’m noticing some internet buzz about the aftermath of its production and its subsequent popularity. For fans of The Amityville Horror, this is a familiar scenario. In short, the current owners of the home are asserting that their lives have been turned upside down by the fallout from the film. There has been trespassing and vandalism, not only at the allegedly haunted house, but also at the grave site of  a local woman.

For those of you who are not ardent followers of developments in the paranormal world, I’ll provide a little cheat sheet, so you know who all these real-life people are.

  • The House – built in 1836, by Dexter Richardson, in in Harrisville, RI. It was then owned by several generations of the Arnold family before passing out their possession. In 1970, the Perron family bought the home. In 1983 the home was purchased by Norma Sutcliffe and her husband, who have occupied it since that time. Originally the estate consisted of 200 acres, but is now a little over eight. The property includes a old barn that figures prominently in the movie. The house itself does not look very much like the house as shown on The Conjuring movie poster.
  • The Perrons – a family of seven (including 5 daughters) that moved into the house in 1970. They lived there until 1981. One daughter, Andrea, has already penned two volumes about her paranormal experiences in the house, and a third is on the way. The Perrons co-operated with the filming of their story, and appeared in publicity materials for The Conjuring.
  • The Warrens – a religious paranormal investigation team (Ed and Lorraine)  who have investigated many haunted houses and paranormal incidents. According to everyone involved, they investigated the experiences of the Perrons while they were in residence at the house. According to the film makers, the movie is “based on a true story” drawn from the files of the Warrens. Lorraine Warren co-operated with the filming and appears in some publicity materials. (Ed died in 2006.)
  • Bathsheba Sherman – an actual woman who lived in the Harris, RI area from 1812 – 1885. She was named in the film as a child-murdering witch. Until recently, her tombstone stood in the Harrisville cemetery. Since the release of the movie, her marker has been repeatedly vandalized.
  • Norma Sutcliffe – purchased the home in 1983 and currently lives on the premises. Prior to the release of The Conjuring, she seemed comfortable discussing the haunting of the house. (As evidenced by some of the videos in the articles I’ve linked to below.) Back in 2005, she invited the Syfy show, Ghost Hunters, to do an investigation of the house.  Since the movie opened, she and her husband are being plagued by thrill seekers and paranormal investigators. She is now denying, or at least down-playing, any paranormal phenomena in the house.

This particular trailer shows how deeply involved the Perrons were with publicity for the film.

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STUFF YOU MAY NOT KNOW

GHOST HUNTERS PROFILED THE HOUSE IN 2005

The T.A.P.S team, of Syfy’s Ghost Hunters fame, did an investigation of the Conjuring House itself in 2005, long before the movie came out. The profile is on an episode called Two Houses: Springfield, MA – Tanguay House and Harrisville, RI – Sutcliffe House; it’s in the second half of this episode, Sutcliffe House, which starts approximately 20 minutes in. (Depending on which video you find.) If you can get your hands on a copy, it’s worth a watch.

I searched on “Ghost Hunters S02E07″ and found a working video. (YouTube videos are notorious for being there one day and not the next, so see what comes up when you search on the terms I’ve listed.)

Ghost-Hunters-random-pics-ghost-hunters-8611287-1152-870

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THOUGHTS FROM ANDREA PERRON & NORMA SUTCLIFFE

Patrick Keller, of The Big Seance, has been doing some in-depth study of this haunting. He is reading a series of books written by a Perron daughter, Andrea, and has had some interaction with Norma Sutcliffe at his blog. Read what he knows at  his post: The Current Owner of The Conjuring House Speaks Out!

In his piece, he has posted the link to a video Sutcliffe has posted on YouTube to dispute the idea that the house is haunted and to ask that people stop trespassing and vandalizing her home. (He’s also summarized its content for those who don’t want to watch the whole video.)

andrea perron

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REPUTATION & GRAVESTONE OF BATHSHEBA SHERMAN

J’aime Rubio, of Dreaming Casually (Investigative Blog), has done some real historical research on the haunting, as it is depicted in the movie here: The Real Bathsheba Sherman – True History vs. “Conjured” Fiction.

bathsheba

Photo from FindAGrave. Click pic for listing.

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HISTORY VS. HOLLYWOOD

History vs. Hollywood has an extensive overview of fact vs. film in their post, THE CONJURING (2013). this article features photographs of the actual persons involved in the story, as well as of the house. Note that J’aime Rubio (listed above) disputes much of the Bathsheba Sherman story as it is written in this article.

history v hollywood the conjuring

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A QUICK OVERVIEW

Mental Floss has a good short article up called The Real Story Behind The Conjuring. It features a link to a video of a conversation between Andrea Perron and Norma Sutcliffe.

movie poster the conjuring

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MY (RANDOM) AFTER-THOUGHTS

BASED ON TRUE:

I think the movie is a great addition to the paranormal horror film genre. It strikes s a nice balance between maintaining a generally creepy atmosphere and subjecting the audience to the right number of effective jump-scare moments. The plot, as in unfolds in the film, is engrossing. The acting is superb. It’s flaws, in fact, all lie in the based-on-a-true-story nature of the film.

As a genuine paranormal horror fan AND a woman with a deep interest in real-world paranormal occurrences, I dislike based-on-true stories. There is a distinct difference between fiction and documentary … and based-on-true is neither.

Of course, I understand the commercial value of the genre and I understand that it’s not going to go away. In the interest of protecting historical sites and bystanders, however, I believe it’s time to start obscuring details. It would not be difficult to cite the Amityville House and the Conjuring House as examples of  the reason that “names have been changed to protect the innocent” in future projects. In this case, if the Perrons were comfortable being identified, that’s fine. The house, however, should have been located in a fictional town and the name of the “local witch woman” should have been fabricated.

The headstone belonging to Bathsheba Sherman was 129 years old. She may very well have been a fine, upstanding woman. Even if she wasn’t, her grave should not have been vandalized. Some of the blame for that goes to the idiots who did the damage, but Perron and Warren and New Line Cinema must be held accountable too – for putting a spotlight on the stone.

I may be conflicted about Norma Sutcliffe’s seeming back-tracking about whether the house is haunted or not, but in light of the vandalism to the grave I completely share her fear that her historic barn will end up being another casualty of this film’s popularity.

THE WARRENS:

Even before I learned of the negative after-effects of the movie, I was unhappy with the way the Warrens were portrayed in the film. When I added The Conjuring to my 13 most haunting films list immediately after seeing it, I wrote:

I am not a big fan of the real-life Lorraine and Ed Warren. There I said it. ‘Seems to me they have a clear agenda, and that is to assign a demonic nature to the hauntings they come across. On the way to the movie with my husband, Ogre, I shared that opinion. (He’s not well-versed in paranormal studies, and had never heard of the Warrens.) AFTER the movie, he said, “Well it’s no wonder the Warrens approved the film, considering how the studio bent over backwards to …” be so complimentary. (I’m paraphrasing that last bit – I can’t repeat what he actually said. This is a PG-13 blog.)

I’ve never been comfortable with the methods and ideologies of the Warrens. Though I believe some hauntings are demonic or evil, I also believe that the vast majority are not. It might be worth noting that Ed often referred to himself as a demonologist rather than as a paranormal investigator.

HYPOCRISY & THIS BLOG:

I’m actually a little uncomfortable posting this because I am listing real names and places myself. Please understand that I would not do that it the cat weren’t already out of the bag. All these names and addresses are readily available on the web. That is not going to change either – even if authors and studios do implement a protection policy, hard-core folks are going to be able to find the information they need. My hope is that changing the policy would weed out the casual viewer that is likely to do spur-of-the-moment, on-a-dare-while-wasted, damage. In contrast to those nitwits, I believe most true paranormal people are respectful.

In the event that any of my readers visits the area of the alleged haunting, I would hope that an understanding of the consequences of thoughtless actions would moderate their behavior if necessary. I’m pretty sure anyone who see this would be far more likely to leave flowers and a note (perhaps, “Innocent until proven guilty.”) on the grave of Bathsheba, than do damage or make trouble.

~*~

13 ghost link button

Click for ghost story movie recommendations.


Totally off-topic and probably written too casually …

I am ridiculously excited about going to a movie tomorrow.

boyhood

” The life of a young man, Mason, from age 5 to age 18.”

We caught the trailer for Boyhood by Richard Linklater, starring Patricia Arquette and Ethan Hawke. while we we watching TV. This film was made over the course of 12 years!! It is not a documentary, it’s a story about a family from the perspective of a boy over the years as he grows up from five to eighteen.

This concept just blows me away. I’ve been reading up on it a little and the critics and test audiences are calling it one of the best films ever made.

It opens tomorrow in the art houses, but I’m betting it will make the leap to mainstream cinemas if it’s as good as they say. I’ll let you know what I think tomorrow night.

Check out the 99% critics rating / 92% audience rating on Rotten Tomatoes.

I can’t believe I didn’t know this was out there and coming.


July 16th, 1945: “It worked.” – Oppenheimer

Sixty-nine years ago today, the first atomic bomb was detonated at the White Sands Proving Ground, in Socorro County, New Mexico.

That was long before I was born, of course, but my entire childhood was lived in the shadow of that day. I was a tag-along baby, born to my mother when she was 40. My youngest sister was 14 when I was born in 1967. The middle one was born in 1950. The eldest was born in 1945 — she was about two months old when the Trinity test happened.

(Yes, that’s the same sister I recently wrote about. She is recovering beautifully after an emergency surgery to remove a bleeding brain tumor that no one knew was there.)

Because of my position in the family, my world was clouded by more nuclear awareness than the worlds of most of my age-mates. My uncle served in the Pacific Theater during WWII. He was a big fan of atomic warfare. My mother seems to have avoided much real political awareness and thus never commented on her feelings about the atom bomb, other than to say she was glad it ended the war. My sisters, on the other hand, actually remember doing duck and cover drills in school, and they mentioned it often as I was growing up. (Apparently that sort of shit will scar you.) The oldest was 17 in 1962, during the Cuban Missile Crisis.

To further intensify my fear of impending nuclear doom, I came of age in the 80s – a time of elevated tensions in the Cold War. I was 16 in September 1983 when a Soviet Su-15 interceptor shot down Korean Air Flight 007, which was en route from New York City to Seoul. Just a month later, NATO, including the US, conducted nuclear war games despite the thick tension between the US and the Soviet Union. The Soviets believed the simulation, called Able Archer, might be a smokescreen for an actual first-strike attack.

Now, in hindsight, many historians assert that November, 1983 was the closest we’ve been to full-scale nuclear war since the Cuban Missile Crisis.

Thank God I didn’t know how close we were to total annihilation at the time.

Not that my paranoia wasn’t already full-blown, thanks to some of the films of the 80s like:

Then there was the publication of The Postman, by David Brin, in 1995 followed by Swan Song, by Robert McCammon, in 1987.

By the time the Berlin Wall fell in 1989, I was permanently scarred.

Nowadays, I keep close track of which nations have nuclear capabilities. I worry about the antics of Putin and Kim Jung-un. I continue to have nightmares about nuclear winter. And I still notice the anniversaries of nuclear events. I’ve always figured I’m fairly well-schooled on all things atomic, but I did not know that this memorial existed until today. Now I’m trying to figure out if I want to visit there someday or if I never want to go near it.

What about you?

Trinity Site Obelisk National Historic Landmark

Image from Wikipedia Commons

In an interview in 1965, Oppenheimer was persuaded to reveal the thought that entered his mind after seeing the explosion.

From Wikipedia:

We knew the world would not be the same. A few people laughed, a few people cried. Most people were silent. I remembered the line from the Hindu scripture, the Bhagavad Gita; Vishnu is trying to persuade the Prince that he should do his duty and, to impress him, takes on his multi-armed form and says, ‘Now I am become Death, the destroyer of worlds.’ I suppose we all thought that, one way or another.

According to his brother, at the time Oppenheimer simply exclaimed, “It worked.”


Wow. Modern medicine is awesome.

We went to visit my sister again today. She looks and sounds amazing! Though the expectation was that she’d be in the hospital for weeks, they are talking about letting her go home in another two or three days. Her spirits are high and there seems to be NO residual effects from the incredibly invasive brain surgery she just went through. As my Ogre said, “She’s a resilient little thing.”

I hope everyone had a great holiday weekend. I know I did, after all was said and done. I’m also looking forward to getting back to the work week … I have some serious catching up to do.


And, as usual, life takes a turn when you least expect it.

Yesterday, not long after updating my post about recommitting to productive routines, and crowing about how I control my own schedule, I got a phone call.

One of my sisters needed to tell me that another sister had been suddenly stricken by a “bleeding brain tumor.”

My beloved Ogre came home from work early and drove me into St. Paul. We spent the evening in the neurological ICU, gathering and relaying information to further-flung relatives.

Right now I’m at home. The surgery is happening as I type. We won’t know much of anything for several hours, and we won’t know everything for many weeks, perhaps months. Because this isn’t my story, and because many of my family members greatly value their privacy, I won’t say much more about it, but I will make an all-clear update if I get one. (If you know the family in real life, and want more details, please don’t leave any identifying comments or questions. Just call me.)

I was reminded last night, though, of how I got to be the way that I am. Because that’s almost entirely about me, I feel okay about telling what happened. Besides, I need to do something to keep my mind and hands busy.

The time came when all the necessary decisions had been made and my sister needed to be left alone to rest. Those of us who were in attendance had moved to the hallway so we could talk. As I looked around the circle of my sister’s children, I was struck by how different everyone looked — it had been a couple of years since I’d seen most of them, outside of  snapshots and profile pictures on Facebook. Because all my sisters are a generation older than me, their children are about my age. A couple of my nieces are actually a year or two older than me. As children, we were pretty much raised together by a close-knit pack of four women. In the last 20 years or so, though, we’d spread out and fallen mostly out of regular touch.

Right about then, someone called me for another update, which made my cell phone go off.

My ringtone is the theme from Halloween.

I dealt with the call then responded to the quizzical, slightly shocked expressions around me with a defensive, “What? You all know me!”

There was general laughter. Then one of my nieces reached out and grabbed my hand. To everyone she said, “She’s always been … spooky.” She positioned my hand in mid-air, waist-height, palm up. She asked me, “Do you remember this?”

I had no idea what she was talking about. She told me to close my eyes. I did, and I waited. A few seconds later, I clearly felt her hand take an opposing position above mine.

Understand, she didn’t actually touch my hand with hers, she just allowed her palm to hover a few inches above mine. The heat and the charge that quickly built up in the space between our palms was intense. The sensation was both shocking and totally familiar.

Suddenly I remembered playing this game with my family all the time. If I recall correctly, we used a blindfold to avoid accidental cheating. There would be at least three of us together — one receiver, one sender and one witness. We’d always start with with making the connection with our hands, just the way my niece did it in the hospital. Then the blind-folded receiver would stand quietly while the sender would hover over different body parts, from different distances. The witness would make sure there was no actual touching, nor sound clues being passed.

Some of us were better at it than others. This particular niece and I used to be very good at either role, especially when we played together.

Last night, standing in the hospital hallway, it all came back to me. The thought that sort of exploded in my mind at the time was  this, “Oh, that’s right. We were all a family of unschooled heritage witches.”

Now I’m remembering lots of things, but it’s time for me to go pick up a couple of young menfolk and let them ride home in the bed of my pickup truck. (I checked. It’s legal here in Minnesota. It’s a short ride, and I’ll be extra careful.)

Us kids, we rode in the back of dilapidated trucks all the time.

God, that was a long time ago.

—–

[update] It’s late. The surgery apparently went well. I’ve gone for a long walk and now I’m going to soak in a hot bath. My shoulders are sore down to the bones and I need to try to get the muscles to relax.

 

gypsy costume

Me, circa 1970-something, in a gypsy costume my sister (this sister) made.

 


Taking stock on July 2nd, the middle day of the year.

[EDIT] I’ve changed the title and the thrust of this post, which first went up in the middle of the night last night.

It just occurred to me that today – July 2nd – is the exact middle day of the year!  It seems an excellent opportunity to think about how things are going in 2014 and to make adjustments.

Ok. To be entirely truthful, I actually spent July 1st putting my blogging and writing life in order. And I originally posted most of this entry on what I think of of as last night. (So goes the life of a night owl.) Still, I’m pleased serendipity moved to take stock and put things in order on such an appropriate date.

HERE’S WHAT I ORGANIZED “YESTERDAY”:

The Read in 2014 page.

- updated my list (and GoodReads) with recently read books. (I don’t review them, I just list and link.) I wish I could be more confident that I remembered them all, but I know I’ve missed some.

Why: I’ve been doing more reading lately, and updating this list gave me a little positive feedback on the effort. I think it’s important to read within the genre in which I write. (And  just for fun.) I’ve joined Audible, so that I can listen to at least a book a month while I’m at work (folding laundry) and when I’m walking. 

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The #hauntedphotoaweek page and galleries.

- checked in on the 3 “feeder galleries”, added recent submissions to the best of the #hauntedphotoaweek gallery, and changed the way haunted pictures are displayed here on the blog.

I feel bad for just wandering away from this idea so completely for the last several months. Now that the weather is nicer, though, I’ll be taking more photographs. If that seems likely for you too, please consider adding to any of the feeder galleries — I promise I’ll be better at checking for new shots.

Why: I want to encourage myself to get out and take pictures while the weather is wonderful. At a deeper level, I want to be even more aware of the beauty and wonder surrounding me, whether it be haunting or uplifting.

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The My WriMoProg page.

- dusted of my editorial calendar and defined my goals for the month. Let’s just say I’m feeling ambitious. I’m shooting for 200+ hours of work in July. To see the rationale for THAT, pop over to my WriMoProg page and read “setting the goal for July”.

Why: Well because I want to write more, and to feel like I’m making real progress toward my primary goal. Setting lofty goals in July is smart for me, because I feel more driven to create in the summer.

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The *Courting Creepy: 13 slots for an ever-shifting list of movies I have to see.* list.

- transferred viewing suggestions I’ve been getting to my to-see list, and figured out which ones I can lay my hands on. I made sure all the available movies are either in my streaming or DVD queue at Netflix. (They are marked, in case you want to take advantage of the research I did to adjust your own Netflix list.) That should come in handy as the days get hotter and I want to just take a break and relax in an air conditioned, dimly lit room.

Why: I want to stay on top of  developments in my chosen genre AND I want to make it easy to sit down and watch a movie without fussing over my Netflix queue.

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The 13 most haunting films, for ghost story lovers (and another 13+ worth watching.) list.

- updated the list to reflect the ghost films I’ve seen in the last couple of months. ONE of the top-13 slots has changed, and a handful of films have been added to the bonus list.

Why: This is the most popular post at The Paranormalist, and I feel it’s important to keep it as current as possible. With the backlog caught up, I can do quick updates as I watch the films on my to-see list.

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MOST IMPORTANTLY:

I also re-familiarized myself with my fiction project and spent the allotted time working on that.

ADDED LINKS, IN HONOR OF MIDDLE-DAY:

I wrote a series of posts earlier this year - Resolutions Review – about tools that can support goals and resolutions. Today seems like a fine day to re-share them.

Write more with fun (free) productivity tools: Focus Booster, Write or Die, Camp NaNoWriMo, WriMoProg & progress meters.

How Spark People helped me lose 10 pounds in 11 weeks without dieting.

How “You Need A Budget” (YNAB) helped us save $1000 in less than 3 months.

Links to these articles, and other paranormal lifestyle tips, can be found in the Body Preservation section of the blog. (And, yes, I updated that page too.)

body preservation

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wrimoprog 07/01/2014:  4 + 12 = 16/208


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