Macabre Media: John Barleycorn by Steve Winwood & Stephen King’s ancestry.

NOW:

Here it is, the first of September, the end of Labor day weekend. There will still be hot summery days, and thunderstorms, but harvest season has come. In that spirit, I’d like to share a harvest song:

Here are the traditional lyrics of this British folk song which pre-dates the 17th century:

There were three men coming out of the west
their fortunes for to try
and these three men made a solemn vow
John Barleycorn should die.
They ploughed him in
they harrowed him in
threw clods all over his head.
And these three men they swore and vowed:
John Barleycorn was dead.

They let him lie for a very long time
till rain from heaven did fall.
And little Sir John sprung up his head
and so amazed them all.
They let him stand till midsummer’s day
he looked both pale and wan.
And little Sir John’s grown a long long beard
and so became a man.

They hired men with the scythes so sharp
to cut him off at knee.
They rolled him and tied him ’round the waist
and served him barbarously.
Then they sent men with pitchforks strong
to pierce him through the heart.
And the loader served him worse than that
for he’s bound him to a cart.

They hired men with crab-tree sticks
to cut him skin from bone
the miller served him worse than that
and ground him between two stones.
And little Sir John and the dark brown bowl
and he’s brandy in the glass
and little Sir John and the dark brown bowl
grew the strongest man at last.

& LATER:

Stephen King will be featured on PBS’s celebrity ancestry research show, Finding Your Roots.  His episode – the first of the season – is In Search of Our Fathers, and it will air Tuesday, September 23rd at 8/7c.

As usual, I’ll give you a heads-up a little closer to the broadcast on my Twitter / Facebook / G+ feed.

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The 10 best not-horror, not-scary books by Stephen King. (Plus two you should read even though they are scary.)

Against all odds, several of my regular readers are NOT horror fans. (And I live with another horror avoider too.) I think it’s a shame that these folks have been deprived of the experience of reading Stephen (the) King  just because of his scary reputation for writing only in the horror genre.

For my contribution to this week’s fourth (and final?) King’s March link-up (a Stephen King-themed blog hop) I’ve decided to reach out to such people with a list of 10 great reads for fans of good writing, as long as it’s not considered to be in the horror genre. These books will neither gross anyone out, nor cause nightmares (probably.)

The author here is Stephen King, though, so be prepared for the stories to bring up some strong emotions. The surprise – for non-King readers – will be that those emotions may include wonder, amusement, tenderness, admiration, hope, nostalgia, awe, wistfulness, and joy.

10 not-horror, not-scary books by Stephen King

The Green Mile

They call death row at Cold Mountain Penitentiary “The Green Mile.” John Coffey, sentenced to die for the rape and murder of two young girls, is the latest addition to the Mile. Paul Edgecomb, the ward superintendent, discovers that there is more to John Coffey than meets the eye, for this friendly giant has the power to heal.

Dolores Claiborne

Suspected of killing Vera Donovan, her wealthy employer, Dolores Claiborne tells police the story of her life, harkening back to her disintegrating marriage and the suspicious death of her violent husband, Joe St. George, thirty years earlier. Dolores also tells of Vera’s physical and mental decline and of her loyalty to an employer who has become emotionally demanding in recent years.

Joyland

After realizing his romantic life is not going in the direction he’d hoped, Devin Jones decides to take a summer job at an amusement park. There he makes friends with Tom Kennedy and Erin Cook, also summer hires at Joyland, which years before had been the scene of the murder of a young woman named Linda Gray whose ghost is said to be seen at the Horror House. He also befriends a young boy, named Mike Ross and his mother, Annie. Their lives all become entwined when Devin decides to investigate the mystery of Linda Gray’s unsolved murder by the “Carny Killer.”

11/22/63

Jake Epping is a thirty-five-year-old high school English teacher in Lisbon Falls, Maine, who makes extra money teaching adults in the GED program. He receives an essay from one of the students—a gruesome, harrowing first person story about the night 50 years ago when Harry Dunning’s father came home and killed his mother, his sister, and his brother with a hammer. Harry escaped with a smashed leg, as evidenced by his crooked walk.

Not much later, Jake’s friend Al, who runs the local diner, divulges a secret: his storeroom is a portal to 1958. He enlists Jake on an insane—and insanely possible—mission to try to prevent the Kennedy assassination. So begins Jake’s new life as George Amberson and his new world of Elvis and JFK, of big American cars and sock hops, of a troubled loner named Lee Harvey Oswald and a beautiful high school librarian named Sadie Dunhill, who becomes the love of Jake’s life—a life that transgresses all the normal rules of time.

The Colorado Kid

Vince Teague and Dave Bowie are the sole operators of The Weekly Islander, a small Maine newspaper.  Stephanie McCann has been working for them as an intern.   When Stephanie asks if they’ve ever come across a real unexplained mystery in the fifty years they’d been publishing the paper, they tell her the story of The Colorado Kid.

The Eyes of the Dragon

Once upon a time, in the Kingdom of Delain, King Roland is murdered and his son and heir, Peter, is framed for the crime. Peter and his loyal friends must battle an evil wizard and Peter’s usurper brother, Thomas, for the throne. Imprisoned in a tower, Peter conceives an escape plan that will take him years to execute before taking on Flagg, the powerful sorcerer who has masterminded this coup.

The Girl Who Loved Tom Gordon

Nine-year-old Trisha McFarland strays from the path while she and her recently divorced mother and brother take a hike along a branch of the Appalachian Trail. Lost for days, wandering farther and farther astray, Trisha has only her portable radio for comfort. A huge fan of Tom Gordon, a Boston Red Sox relief pitcher, she listens to baseball games and fantasizes that her hero will save her. Nature isn’t her only adversary, though – something dangerous may be tracking Trisha through the dark woods.

Firestarter

The Department of Scientific Intelligence (aka “The Shop”) never anticipated that two participants in their research program would marry and have a child. Charlie McGee inherited pyrokinetic powers from her parents, who had been given a low-grade hallucinogen called “Lot Six” while at college. Now the government is trying to capture young Charlie and harness her powerful firestarting skills as a weapon.

Different Seasons (four novellas in one volume)

IF you read only ‘Rita Hayworth and the Shawshank Redemption’ and ‘The Body’.

I’ll skip the synopses here, because we pretty much all know the basic stories, thanks to the movies Stand By Me and The Shawshank Redemption.

On Writing

On Writing is both a textbook for writers and a memoir of Stephen’s life and will, thus, appeal even to those who are not aspiring writers. If you’ve always wondered what led Steve to become a writer and how he came to be the success he is today, this will answer those questions.

 

ALL THAT SAID, FANS OF GREAT STORIES – HORROR OR NOT – MUST READ IT AND THE STAND, EVEN THOUGH THEY ARE SCARY.

 

scary horror stephen king it

A promise made twenty-eight years ago calls seven adults to reunite in Derry, Maine, where as teenagers they battled an evil creature that preyed on the city’s children. Unsure that their Losers Club had vanquished the creature all those years ago, the seven had vowed to return to Derry if IT should ever reappear. Now, children are being murdered again and their repressed memories of that summer return as they prepare to do battle with the monster lurking in Derry’s sewers once more.

scary horror stephen king the stand

One man escapes from a biological weapon facility after an accident, carrying with him the deadly virus known as Captain Tripps, a rapidly mutating flu that – in the ensuing weeks – wipes out most of the world’s population. In the aftermath, survivors choose between following an elderly black woman to Boulder or the dark man, Randall Flagg, who has set up his command post in Las Vegas. The two factions prepare for a confrontation between the forces of good and evil.

NOTE: All the synopses and book jacket images above were obtained directly from stephenking.com.

*****

ON THE TOPIC OF THIS BLOG HOP / LINKY:

I’ve really learned a lot from participating in this blog hop / linky, and I feel like I understand how such things work MUCH better now.

KingsMarch_zps31f8f79e

Click the pic to go to this week’s link up.

Wensend &  Fourth Street Review (the hosts of this linky) have each posted summaries and links to the week-3 posts, and the final linky sign-up gadget.

Just click either of those links you just saw to see what other bloggers have been writing about recently. (Interestingly, some of the participants are not horror fan and do not enjoy a scary read. I did not expect that when I signed up, but it’s been interesting how they handle the Stephen King theme.)

My own previous entries include:

The wisdom of Stephen King: best quotes from Constant Writer.

Stephen King, everywhere I look.

Reading Stephen King in March & figuring out how blog hops / linkies work.

————-

wrimoprog 04/02/2014:  6 + 4 = 10/182


The wisdom of Stephen King: best quotes from Constant Writer.

For this week’s King’s March, I decided to share my favorite quotes from my favorite author. As long as I was at it, I turned some of them into a sort of quiz. I also created a list at a site where your can up-vote your favorite or add one that I missed. You’ll find all that below. Before we go there, though, I want to do a quick update on my experiment with this linky / bloghop.

KingsMarch_zps31f8f79e

BLOG HOPS / LINKIES

For those of you following along, this post is part of an experiment intended to help me learn about and understand blog hops, aka linkies. I revealed my confusion about the practice in the first post in the series. Now I’m starting to get it … and I am pleased. If you have a look at the comments thread on my second King-themed post, you’ll see that the hosts of this King’s March linky are keeping track of the participants’ entries on their blogs. (In the comments to my post there are two “pingback” notifications, which lead back to where they’ve mentioned my blog, as well as those of the other participants.)

The way it’s done – or at least the way these two bloggers do it – is to create a weekly post which summarizes the blogs created in honor of the linky in the previous week. They also put up a new linky widget where participants can add another link, to another post. That’s the best way for non-participants to gain easy access to all the themed posts … go to the scheduled update post at the host blog or blogs, and browse the links and / or take a peek at the linky itself to see what’s going up throughout the week. In this case, the update post goes up on Saturdays. (It’s not very different from my #NetNet posts, now that I think about it.)

Here are the links to last Saturday’s summary posts at Forth Street Review and at Wensend. If you go there, you’ll see the link to my post from last week among the others. If you click the “Mister Linky You’re Next” icon, you’ll see a list of what’s going up this week, including this post.

Pretty cool.

BACK TO STEPHEN KING

I’m obsessed with my fiction writing lately, and I’m STILL working on Christine. I wanted to contribute something fun to the hop this week though, so I’ve spent some hours hunting down my favorite Stephen King quotes. I’m cool with the time investment, because *I* am his number one fan.

Can you place the quote in the right book?
(Highlight the space between the parentheses to check your answers.)

1. “I am your number one fan.”
(Misery)

2. “The soil of a man’s heart is stonier; a man grows what he can and tends it.”
(Pet Sematary)

3. “Get busy living or get busy dying…..there ain’t nothing in between.”
(Different Seasons)

4. “It’s a Dance. And sometimes they turn the lights off in this ballroom.
But we’ll dance anyway, you and I. Even in the Dark. Especially in the Dark.
May I have the pleasure?”
(Danse Macabre)

5. “He thrusts his fists against the posts and still insists he sees the ghosts.”
(   It      )

6. “Anything with the power to make you laugh over thirty years later isn’t a waste of time. I think something like that is very close to immortality.”
(Hearts in Atlantis)

7. “I never had any friends later on like the ones I had when I was 12 – Jesus, did you?”
(The Body aka Stand By Me)

8. “Calling it a simple schoolgirl crush was like saying a Rolls-Royce was a vehicle with four wheels, something like a hay-wagon. She did not giggle wildly and blush when she saw him, nor did she chalk his name on trees or write it on the walls of the Kissing Bridge. She simply lived with his face in her heart all the time, a kind of sweet, hurtful ache. She would have died for him.”
(It              )

9. “Sometimes being a bitch is all a woman’s got to hold on to.”
(Dolores Claiborne)

10. “The thing under my bed waiting to grab my ankle isn’t real. I know that, and I also know that if I’m careful to keep my foot under the covers, it will never be able to grab my ankle.”
(Night Shift)

11. “God grant me the serenity to accept what I cannot change, the tenacity to change what I may, and the good luck not to fuck up too often.”
(‘Salem’s Lot)

12. “True sorrow is as rare as true love.”
(Carrie)

13. “The place where you made your stand never mattered. Only that you were there… and still on your feet.”
(The Stand)

14. “In small towns people scent the wind with noses of uncommon keenness.”
(The Stand)

15. “God is cruel. Sometimes he makes you live.”
(Desperation)

16, “All work and no play makes Jack a dull boy.”
(The Shining- thanks, Mark!)

HOW MANY DID YOU GET RIGHT?

*****

It’s like he’s talking straight to me.

Sometimes, I think I over-identify with King. Maybe we all do, and maybe that’s what makes him such a devastatingly effective author. It’s like he just “gets it” in a way that many others don’t.

I’m bipolar, so these resonate:

“I think that we’re all mentally ill. Those of us outside the asylums only hide it a little better – and maybe not all that much better after all.”

“There’s no bitch on earth like a mother frightened for her kids.”

“When his life was ruined, his family killed, his farm destroyed, Job knelt down on the ground and yelled up to the heavens, ‘Why god? Why me?’ and the thundering voice of God answered, ‘There’s just something about you that pisses me off.”

“Monsters are real, and ghosts are real too. They live inside us, and sometimes, they win.”

I’m a horror writer, so these resonate:

“I recognize terror as the finest emotion and so I will try to terrorize the reader. But if I find that I cannot terrify, I will try to horrify, and if I find that I cannot horrify, I’ll go for the gross-out. I’m not proud.”

“Fiction is the truth inside the lie.”

“I’ve said it before, and I’ll say it again. When you find something at which you have talent, you do that thing (what ever it is) until your fingers bleed or your eyes pop out of your head.”

“I never saw any of my dad’s stories. My mother said he had piles and piles of manuscripts.”

*****

So, what are your favorites?

Some of you may remember my Ranker list, Classic Trick or Treat Loot. Creating that and watching it take off as people shared their opinions was fun. I wanted to do the same thing with these Stephen King quotes, but it turns out Ranker makes terrible quote lists … ugly, just ugly. I found another ranking site called The Top Tens, which does a better job of displaying sentences in a pleasing way. Pop over and check it out. You can up-vote your favorite quote, add one I forgot, or even re-rank the whole set in a list of your own.

stephen king quotes

————-

wrimoprog 03/27/2014:  41 + 30 = 71/80


Stephen King, everywhere I look.

I forgot that I was supposed to write a Stephen King themed blog for the second week of the King’s March linky sponsored by Forth Street Review and Wendsend.

KingsMarch_zps31f8f79e

Click the pic to go to this week’s link up.

Luckily, I’ve been completely immersed in King for the entire month.

1) I’m continuing to re-read Christine. On this pass, I’m learning a great deal about how to do a first person narrative elegantly, which is going to come in handy because my planned writing project for April is in first person.

2) I enjoyed reading all the blogs posted by the other King’s March participants, but my favorite was this one:

LITERARY MIXTAPE | THE STAND by Rory, of Fourth Street Review.

I might chose different songs (and I might actually do it, some hot night this summer, while sitting on the patio with my iPod speaker-stand-thingie and a beer) but I can’t fault the creativity that went into Rory’s selections.

3) What I didn’t expect was that I would be watching The Shawshank Redemption this week. My son “had” to watch it so that he can participate in a group project for his communications class. The assignment is to study the relationships between characters in the film, then write about the dynamics of said relationships.

I’ve never been so pleased with a professor before.

Ogre and I happily settled in with The Boy one blustery evening last week. Of course, we’d both seen the movie, but this was the first viewing for our son. He is not familiar with King, because he’s not interested in horror. (He’s a fantasy guy.) No matter how I often I tell him that King isn’t JUST about horror, and that even the all-out horror novels aren’t the kind of horror he thinks they are, I’ve not been able to persuade him to give Constant Writer a fair shake.

I’m sure it will surprise no one that he loved the movie.

I was rather hoping that seeing the film would make him want to read the book immediately, but I’d forgotten how even formerly voracious child-readers resist reading anything they don’t have to in these high school / college years. I’ll just have to wait until summer, when perhaps he’ll be willing to read for fun again. (Believe me, I’ll be leaving tempting stacks of King books around, just in case.) In the meantime, I can’t wait to see which relationship he chooses to write about.

There is something to be said for going into a movie with such a specific agenda. (At least upon a second or third viewing.) It focuses you on one aspect of the film, which helps you notice details that are otherwise missed.

My menfolk seemed to think that the relationship most worthy of deeper examination is the one between Andy and Red. I disagree. If I were going to write the paper, I’d explore the relationship between the warden and Andy. Or maybe, if I wanted a challenge, the one between the main guard and Andy … or between the main guard and the warden.

I guess my point is that ALL the relationships in this story are worth a second, deeper look. And that’s just one of the things that makes King a master.

So, if you had to write the paper, who would you pick?

————-

 

wrimoprog 03/16/2014: 15 + 20 = 35/80

 


Reading Stephen King in March & figuring out how blog hops / linkies work.

Despite having a link tool “group” of my own available (WriMoProg) I still don’t really understand linkies / blog hops very well.

As usual, when that’s the case I feel compelled to figure. it. out. I keep think that such events should be great for expanding one’s network, and that I’m missing an excellent opportunity to meet new like-minded people by not using the tool. Perhaps jumping into this event will teach me what I need to know about how link-ups work.

Recently, I stumbled across an event that is dedicated to blogging about Stephen King, and I can’t resist. Just lately, I’ve been on a King re-reading jag anyway … I’m working on Christine now, and just finished The Tommyknockers. In the last couple of months I’ve also read Different Seasons, Pet Sematary and The Shining. I’ve got the audio of Dr. Sleep available to me on my cell phone. (‘Good excuse to log some miles on the treadmill, right?) So here I go:

KingsMarch_zps31f8f79e

The bloghop is hosted by Rory of Fourth Street Review and Wendy at Wensend. You can click either of those links to read about the event and add your name to the Mr. Linky list.

It look like the format is to enter (your first name) @ (the name of your blog) into the “your name” box and to enter your URL, starting with the http://, into the “your URL” box. That’s all you have to do to have your name added to the list of participating bloggers.

After that, you’re supposed to leave a comment on one of the host blogs and make a blog post like this one. (I guess.)

I don’t really know what this means:

Every week during the event there will be a link-up on both our blogs where you can share your reviews, info posts and any other King-related posts. (Wensend.)

But I guess I’ll find out, come Saturday, the 8th.

I assume it’s going to mean that you all will see a post related to Stephen King here at my blog on Fridays in March, starting with this one.

Anyone care to join me?

UPDATE:

Well, on the appointed day – Saturday – I visited the home page of one of the blog hop hosts and there was a new post with a new Mr. Link thing where I could add the link to a blog post about King. I linked to this one. There was also a list of others who had done the same thing. So I visited those listed posts and read and left comments.

I’m still not really getting it, because it seems like a lot of steps that you have to remember to do. I mean, it’s not like you get a reminder or anything. Kinda weird, but I’ll stick with it to see how it goes.


Links to the works of Richard Matheson in television shows, short stories, books and movies.

Eighty-eight years ago yesterday, on February 20th, 1926, Richard Matheson was born. In 1950, his story, Born of Man and Woman, was published in The Magazine of Fantasy and Science FictionIt garnered a great deal of attention and his literary career was launched. He died on June 23rd, 2013. Between those dates, he changed everything in the field of horror. (He also wrote sci-fi, fantasy, westerns and mysteries, but I think his greatest contribution was to my own beloved genre.) To read a simple but complete biography of his life, visit Bio.

If you are a casual horror / sci-fi fan, you may not realize just how influential this writer was in his lifetime. Stephen King is frequently quoted as saying “[Richard Matheson is the] author who influenced me most as a writer.” Just days after Matheson’s death, King posted a tribute, at StephenKing.com, which you can read HERE.

Right now, I want to celebrate this man’s life by getting some of his brilliance into your head. I’ve collected the most easily accessible works in the lists below. Please note that I’ve NOT seen or read everything here. Those pieces that I especially recommend are highlighted in green text. (Please also know that seeing any adaptation of I Am Legend is going to be frustrating. None of them do it justice. In the video interview at the bottom of this post, Matheson says so himself.)

*****

TELEVISION SERIES

TheTwilightZoneLogo

It’s possible at hulu.com to stream all episodes of the original Twilight Zone series on your computer for free. This is what Matheson contributed to that series:

THE TWILIGHT ZONE:

S1 E11 And When the Sky Opened
S1 E14 Third From the Sun
S1 E18 The Last Flight
S1 E23 A World of Difference
S1 E36 A World of His Own

S2 E7 Nick of Time
S2 E15 The Invaders
(This is, perhaps, the most memorable episode from my childhood, when I’d sneak to turn the TV on the middle of the night, when everyone else was asleep.)

S3 E13 Once Upon a Time
S3 E26 Little Girl Lost
S3 E34 Young Man’s Fancy

S4 E5 Mute
S4 E6 Death Ship

S5 E2 Steel
S5 E3 Nightmare at 20,000 Feet
S5 E19 Night Call
S5 E21 Spur of the Moment

NIGHT GALLERY (1971):

S2 E8 (segment The Big Surprise)
S2 E22 (segment The Funeral)

STAR TREK:
S1 E5 The Enemy Within (You must be a subscriber to watch Star Trek on hulu.)

*****

SHORT STORIES

Return

Like so many authors of his generation, Matheson wrote for periodicals, and in his time there were many wonderful, inexpensive pulp-style magazines to host his creativity. At unz.org, you will find “A Free Website for Periodicals, Books, and Videos” where you can view PDFs of certain stories, just as they appeared when they were published.

FROM STARTLING STORIES:
Miss Stardust (March, 1955)
Witch War (July, 1951)

FROM THRILLING WONDER STORIES:
Return (October, 1951)
The Foodlegger (April, 1952)

*****

BOOKS

hell house bantam 1973 matheson

Of course, Matheson was an author of books too … many of them horror. I believe you will (always and forever) find him on the shelves of any decent bookstore, but a lot of us have switched to e-books. Here’s what I found at Amazon:

KINDLE EDITIONS
The Memoirs of Wild Bill Hickok $6.64
The Gun Fight $5.98
Legends of the Gun Years $8.89
Other Kingdoms $7.59
The Path: A New Look At Reality $7.59
Shadow on the Sun $6.83
Duel: Terror Stories by Richard Matheson $8.89
The Beardless Warriors: A Novel of World War II $7.59
Hunted Past Reason $8.89
Steel: And Other Stories $6.95
A Stir of Echoes $8.89
What Dreams May Come: A Novel $8.89
Hell House $8.89
The Box: Uncanny Stories $6.83
Nightmare At 20,000 Feet: Horror Stories By Richard Matheson $8.89
Somewhere In Time $5.98
I Am Legend (RosettaBooks into Film) $6.09

… but as for that last one, if you are a horror fan, you should own the most beautiful copy of the bound book you can afford. It IS canon.

*****

MOVIES

Kolchak

When it comes to the movie adaptations of Matheson’s work, I’ve gathered a few resources for you. I’ve provided the IMDb listing for all of them, and the Netflix listing where I could. Any movie that is available on streaming is generally available on disc too. If I did not provide a Netflix link, that means it’s not available NOW, but many are expected to become available eventually.

The Incredible Shrinking Man (1957) Netflix Disc IMDb

The Pit and The Pendulum (1961) Netflix Disc IMDb

Burn, Witch, Burn (1962) IMDb

The Last Man on Earth (1964) IMDb

Die! Die! My Darling! (1965) IMDb

The Devil Rides Out (1968) IMDb

De Sade (1969) Netflix Streaming IMDb

Cold Sweat (1970) IMDb

The Omega Man (1971) Netflix Disc IMDb

Duel (1971) Netflix Disc IMDb

The Night Stalker aka The Kolchak Papers (1972) IMDb

The Night Strangler (1973) IMDb

Kolchak: The Night Stalker SeriesSeries on Netflix Streaming

The Legend of Hell House (1973) Netflix Disc IMDb

Dying Room Only (1973) IMDb

Scream of the Wolf (1974) IMDb

Trilogy of Terror (segment, Amelia – the Zuni fetish doll piece, of course, 1975) Netflix Disc IMDb

Dead of Night (1977) Netflix Disc IMDb

The Martian Chronicles (series – 3 episodes 1980) Netflix Disc IMDb

Somewhere in Time (1980) Netflix Streaming IMDb

The Incredible Shrinking Woman (comedy, 1981) IMDb

Twilight Zone: The Movie (segment, Nightmare at 20,00o Feet, 1983) Netflix Disc IMDb

Loose Cannons (comedy, 1990) Netflix Disc IMDb

What Dreams May Come (based on the novel, 1998) Netflix Disc IMDb

Stir of Echos (based on the novel, 1999) Netflix Disc IMDb

I Am Legend (based on the novel, 2007) Netflix Disc IMDb

The Box (based on the short story, Button, Button, 2009) Netflix Disc IMDb

Real Steel (based on the short story, Steel, 2011) Netflix Disc IMDb


Macabre & Mysterious Music: Truth by John Mellencamp

From the soundtrack of Ghost Brothers of Darkland County, a concept album, and musical stage play, from the minds of Stephen King and John Mellencamp.

Ghost Brothers of Darkland County Homepage

NOTE: Because I’m a stickler for respecting copyright, anything posted here at the blog will be carefully vetted – I’ll only embed videos and sound clips posted to YouTube by the artist for sharing, or those being offered by the original artist from the artist’s home page. If you know of a cool, creepy, macabre or mysterious song, drop me a comment. I’m always looking for good stuff.