Body Preservation: Pannekoeken (aka Dutch Baby) a cheap & easy 5-ingredient, 5-step, recipe

This is what I know as a pannekoeken, or a Dutch Baby.

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From just pantry staples (eggs, milk, flour, salt and butter) and a couple of special techniques, it is possible to create an exciting, tasty, light-but-filling, comfort-food, meal that will appeal to even picky eaters.

Scroll down for illustrated step-by-step instructions, and printable recipe.

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My most recent pannekoeken:

Last month, my son and I left Minnesota and visited my daughter and her beau in North Carolina. Though we ate out often during the vacation (so we Yankees could sample some local cuisine) my daughter asked me to make a few recipes from home. One dish she requested was pannekoeken.

As far as I can tell, this is a very Minnesotan thing to eat.

Of course, The Beau, a native North Carolinian, had never heard of it. He was game to try it though.

Pannekoeken What am I eating

When the pannekoeken came out of the oven, he wasn’t sure what to think. He asked my son to snap the above photograph. Even before tasting it, he posted the pic to his Facebook, captioned with the question, “What am I eating?” His friends thought maybe it was Yorkshire Pudding or Bubble and Squeak. (Until they made these good guesses, it hadn’t occurred to me that it was similar to those recipes.)

Once The Beau figured out how* to eat it, he really liked it … according to him, it was possibly better than regular pancakes.

(*Honestly, IMHO, the best way to eat a pannekoeken is to slather it with jelly (the way my son and husband like it) or with lots of butter (the way my daughter and I like it), then pick it up, fold it over and eat it like some kind of weird Minnesota taco. The Beau seemed to enjoy it with butter and syrup, which did make it messier to eat. I guess it could be consumed with the help of a knife and fork, but it’s not as much fun.)

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Is it really a pannekoeken?

As I was getting this post ready, I did my due diligence and googled the word. I have to tell you that either Wikipedia or I have it wrong. The listing at Wikipedia shows a picture of something that looks more like a pancake or crepe. It appears that one would eat several of them at a sitting, in the same way that most folks would eat a stack of flapjacks. One of these pancake-like things would be called a “pannekoek” or a “pannenkoek” with “pannekoken” reserved for the plural.

Whatever.

The following recipe makes something entirely different. Judging by looks alone, my version of pannekoeken is better. And I guarantee that it’s more fun.

(I’m also pretty sure that no one could eat more than one. My 18-year old, six foot, son can eat a whole one, but only barely.)

MAKING THE PANNEKOEKEN:

Here’s what you need:
4 eggs
1 cup milk
1 cup flour
1/2 teaspoon salt
2 tablespoons butter

(It’s even an easy-to-memorize recipe.)

also:
an oven
a measuring cup
a blender (or a strong arm and a whisk)
a 12 inch cast iron pan
OR
a Pyrex glass 2 quart (9″ X 12″) rectangular baking pan

Click here for printable PDF of recipe.

(But read through complete instructions below for additional tips.)

Making a successful pannekoeken is all in the techniques you use.

Here’s how you do it:

Step 1) For each pannekoeken you want to make, measure 1 cup milk into a container and add four eggs. (As you can see, the milk and eggs together measures about two cups.) Let come to room temperature. (At least 1 hour.)

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Step 2) Preheat oven to 425 degrees. Depending on your oven this may take a while. The oven MUST be hot, so the batter will be shocked into trying to climb out of the pan.

You will need to preheat the cooking pan and the butter too, but you do that after the oven has reached the proper temperature. I preheat my oven for about 20 minutes then put my cast iron pan into the hot oven about 10 minutes before I want to start the baking. In the last 2-3 minutes of the preheating time, you will add the 2 tablespoons of butter to the hot cast iron pan so that it melts completely and starts to bubble. NOTE: If you are using the Pyrex dish, you will put the pan and butter into the oven at the same time and heat just just until the butter melts completely and starts to bubble.

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Step 3) Blend the milk and eggs. Add two generous pinches of salt (1/2 teaspoon or a little more) to the whirring mixture, then introduce 1 cup flour, reasonably slowly. (Don’t fret about it, just don’t dump it in all at once.) You are looking to create a thin, bubbly batter. It only takes a minute or two, so I do this while the butter is melting. That way the batter is still airy when I pour it it into the pan.

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Step 4) When the oven, pan and butter are hot, pour the batter into the pan quickly. You don’t want to let a lot of the heat escape in this process. I pull out the shelf using an oven mitt, pour the batter directly from the blender into the pan, slide the shelf back, and close the door.

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Bake the pannekoeken for 18-25 minutes. Do not open the door for at least 15 minutes, and if you are checking for doneness after that, do it gently, opening the door as little as possible. After 18-20 minutes, the pannekoeken will be cooked through, puffed up,  crispy on the outside and egg-y on the inside, and browning at the edges.

2011-11-17 Dutch baby pancake in glass pan

If you let it go a bit longer, it will brown more, and the exterior will crisp more. It’s a matter of taste which way you prefer it. (It’s unlikely you will want to cook it for more than 25 minutes.)

It will be very puffy! Likely it will have risen well above the edge of the pan.

Once it is removed from the oven, the pannekoeken will immediately start falling in the middle. There’s nothing you can do to stop it.

Step 5) Serve. When you remove the pan from the oven, and when you are taking the pannekoeken out of the pan, it is VERY IMPORTANT that you remember the cooking pan is VERY HOT. It’s best to use a thick oven mitt and a silicon or metal spatula while removing the pannekoeken from its pan.

(Why, yes, I have grabbed that smoking-hot handle bare-handed while trying to serve the pannekoeken. Once.)

If you used enough butter for your pan, it will come out easily, after you run your spatula around the edges to separate it from the pan. If it doesn’t come out cleanly, thoroughly scrape out any stuck-on bits and use a little more butter for subsequent pannekoeken.

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Top your pannekoeken with whatever you like on pancakes.

  • Suggestions:
  • Butter
  • Jelly or Preserves
  • Syrup
  • Cinnamon & Sugar
  • Warmed Pie Filling

I suppose one pannekoeken, prepared according to recipe, should probably serve 4. (I can do half of one, sometimes a little more.) According to an online recipe calorie calculator, a whole pannekoeken is about 1,100 calories. One fourth of one would be about 275 calories. Of course that’s before you top it with anything.

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  • This is one recipe in a growing collection of  foods in the Body Preservation section if this blog.
  • Pannekoeken is listed under the category “Food for Writers / Artists / Other Obsessives.” It could just as well have been archived as a “Getting Away With It Food.”
  • For more recipes, and other paranormal lifestyle tips, please visit:
body preservation

Click the Pic to go to Body Preservation


MN Stories: About Stillwater’s Edward Hersey and his 2 wives and 3 houses.

Last weekend, Ogre and I ran away for the day to have a summery date. We drove to the quaint town of Stillwater, Minnesota. Our goal was to score some fudge, taffy and turtle bars from two of the three hand-made candy shops there. (Hey, if a shop makes the best of a certain kind of thing, you’re a fool to not take advantage of it.)

When we arrived, it was such a gorgeous day that we decided to look for something else to do first. It turns out there is a historical trolley tour available during the summer. We hopped on and settled in.

Stillwater – which is on the St. Croix River which separates Minnesota from Wisconsin – was founded as a lumber town even before Minnesota became a state. Its proximity to the river- which was an excellent avenue for transporting the raw lumber to the mills, and the milled lumber to its destination – quickly turned it into a wealthy city. As we cruised up and down the steep hills of the city, we saw dozens of beautiful 19th century mansions. Each was proof of the prosperity Stillwater enjoyed in the years just before the last of the towering white pines of Minnesota were logged out.

[To get an idea of the kind of logging that was done here, you might want to check out a video I made last summer: 1895 Hinkley Minnesota Firestorm.]

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Perhaps the most interesting bit of information we gleaned from our cheerful tour guide was a story about The Worst Husband in the World. Allow me to explain.

First, take a look at this lovely house: stillwater house

320 side view

A side view of the house.

This is 320 Pine St W (Click for listing on Zillow)

Bedrooms:  Bathrooms: 3.5  sq ft4,588 Year Built: 1882

Last Sold: Feb 2002 for $375,000

Isn’t it charming? It was built by a lumber baron, Edward Hersey, as a gift to his wife. But there’s a catch. Do you see that porch and the bay window? stillwater home 2 From either of those vantage points, you see the following view of the opposing house: 319 cloesup

 This is 319 Pine St. W (Click for listing on Zillow)

Bedrooms:  Bathrooms:  sq ft7,000 Year Built:1879

Last Sold: Mar 2004 for $810,660

319 side view

A side view of the house.

This house – 319 Pine St. W – was the first house that Edward Hersey had built for his wife.

According to Stillwater Heirloom & Landmark Sites Program

 In 1879, the Stillwater Lumberman [local newspaper] noted “Edward Hersey about to build on lots at Pine and Sixth.” Behind those few words are numerous associations: the construction of another opulent home for another of Stillwater’s well-to-do lumber families, the possible involvement of architect George Orff in his second home for a Hersey brother, and the abundant use of large, eye-catching architectural elements. The Victorian home offers a virtual laundry list of stylistic elements: a tower, a veranda, a gable, a large chimney, and a two-story bay.

According to our guide, the wife (whose name was Mary, but we’ll take a look at that in more depth in a moment) had a great deal to do with the planning of this house. It seems that Hersey himself was not as thrilled with it as she was. He had dragged his feet about commissioning it in the first place, and didn’t care for it even after he had agreed to have it  built.

As the house was nearing completion, Mary went abroad to purchase proper furnishings for her dream home.

Edward Hersey promptly lost the mansion to his business partner, Jacob Bean, to settle a debt. Some say this debt was actually a high-stakes poker game. (The home is now known at the Ann Bean Mansion, after Jacob Bean’s wife.)

When Mary returned to Stillwater, Edward had already commissioned the building of  the much more modest 320 Pine W house … directly across the street.

The tour guide said that Mary refused to live there.

Well, NSS.

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I could have shared that much of the story with you the night I returned from the daytrip, but I wanted to do a bit of research to confirm the facts. I was able to do that – for the most part anyway – but my digging also left me with some lingering questions.

Above, I mentioned that I wanted to come back to the identity of Edward Hersey’s wife, Mary. Edward actually married TWO women named Mary in his lifetime: Mary Merrill in 1877 and Mary Haskell in 1894. A quick look at the dates of construction of the houses will reveal that the woman in the Stillwater story must have been Mary Merrill.

Just to make this easy for everyone, here the math:

  • Edward was 23 in 1877 when he married Mary Merrill.
  • He was 25 in 1879 when construction began on the big house, 319 Pine W.
  • He was 29 in 1882 when the small house, 320 Pine W, was completed.
  • There is then an 11-year gap in the story until 1894.
  • He was 40 in 1894 when he married 25 year old Mary Haskell.
  • (In 1894, he did something else as well, but I’ll get to that in a sec.)
  • He was only 54 when he died in 1908.
  • Mary Haskell Hersey died in 1950, at the age of 81.

Armed with the knowledge of the second wife, I was left wondering what had happened to the first. My assumption was that she died, so I turned to FindAGrave to discover her fate. Sure enough, I found the Hersey family plot, where Edward was buried, in a nearby St. Paul cemetery. Several members of his family also rest there, including Mary HASKELL Hersey. As for Mary Merrill, though, there is no sign of her in the plot.

Of course it is possible that  Mary Merrill did die, and that her body was sent back to Maine from where both families hailed. I did do a search for her at FindAGrave and came up with two possible results. One has very little info aside from the name Mary E. Hersey. The other grave bears the name Mary M. Hersey, but it is adjacent to a man named Melville Hersey. Neither of these women died before Edward married Mary Haskell.

I have been unable to find any further reference to Mary Merrill Hersey. Mary Haskell Hersey, however, was the darling of the society pages:

According to Stillwater Heirloom & Landmark Sites Program:

In 1896, the St. Paul Globe expressed admiration for the new bride: “Mrs. Edward L. Hersey, who, by her charming personality and culture has identified herself with society in St. Paul and Stillwater, is a brunette of a very lovely type. Her eyes are large and beautiful, of a dark brown, her lashes, brows and soft, luxuriant hair corresponding in color. She is possessed of an almost perfect figure, and her carriage is graceful and stately. In her address one notices a fascinating little accent, peculiar to the East.

I mentioned that Edward Hersey did something else besides marrying the charming Mary Haskell in 1894. He moved into this:

475 Summit Ave

 This is 475 Summit Ave. (Click for listing on Zillow.)

Bedrooms: 11 Bathrooms: 6  sq ft: 7,586 Year Built: 1894

Last Sold: Apr 1993 for $170,000
Estimated current value: $891,813

I guess he really like Mary Haskell.

PS: Just FYI, Summit Ave. was THE ritziest neighborhood in Minnesota at the turn of the century. (It’s still pretty swanky, though this house has been converted to a multi-family rental property.)

ALSO: Edward’s daughter, Marie Hersey was a chum of F. Scott Fitzgerald. Apparently he spent a lot of time in this house, back in the day.

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POST postscript: I just ran into a thing called Storify and I’m playing with it. I tossed together a test and am attempting to embed it below, so I can see what it is and how it looks. Ignore at will.


‘NetNet: horror movies, a blog toy, LOLs, soup, bats and nudity.

A short NetNet, this week folks. Apparently League of Legends has an exciting new update that The Boy must play as much as possible. And The Ogre is telling me we have to grocery shop, go to the gym and do laundry. Sigh. I might add a few more links later tonight. In the meantime:

LISTEN TO THE MONSTER MEN DISCUSS RECENT HORROR FILMS

I love to hear these two talk about movies. As usual, I watched the show with a pen in hand and a browser window open. Here’s a list of the movies mentioned, and their availability right now.

R = Redbox | N = Netflix Streaming | D = Netflix Disc

The Fourth Kind (N) – The Purge (RD) – Dark Skies (RD) – Paranormal Activity 3 & 4 (NR) – Insidious (D) – The Bay (RN) – Absence (N) – Sinister (RD) –  You’re Next (R) – The Lords of Salem (RD) – The Devil’s Rejects (D) – Kiss of the Damned (N) – The Conjuring (RD)

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 … SPEAKING OF THE CONJURING

If you’re just now seeing it for the first time, please consider responding to my poll: When would you get the hell out of the houe in The Conjuring? If you answered the question back when it was in the theaters, you might be interested to see what the consensus is so far.

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PLAY WITH A NEW (FREE) BLOG TOY

Matthew Alan Bennett brings to us this fun-looking presentation creation software. This is his sample doodle:

I haven’t had a chance to play with it, but you know I will. If you want to give it a go, visit powtune.com.

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HAVE A GRIN / SNICKER / CHUCKLE

Have you popped over to my cheeseburger collection, ParanormalLOLs lately? I add new funnies whenever they come through my feeds, and this was a particularly good week.

chupa

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MAKE SOME SOUP THIS WEEKEND

I swear November weekends cry out for a big pot of soup or stew. On Sunday, I’ll be posting a recipe for my all-time favorite soup, (which I made last weekend, so I could photograph the process.) Unless you want to do step one of MY recipe (roast a turkey) tonight, however, you may want to join me in trying Minnesota Wild Rice soup this weekend.

wild rice soup

I found this recipe over at Debra DeLong‘s website. We got into a lengthy comment discussion about the “Minnesota-ness” of wild rice … because she’s in Ohio and I’m in Minnesota. (She even wrote a follow up post about it.)

At Romancing the Bee, Debra usually posts recipes involving honey. Because she keeps bees. Because she’s cool like that.

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LOOK AT ADORABLE PICTURES OF BATS

This week, Deborah DeLong ALSO reblogged a piece from Buzzfeed, This is Why We Should Love Bats. It has 20+ pics of bats being awesome. Like these:

(I don’t usually share reblogs here at NetNet, but I made an exception for the bats. Because they are bats.)

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CONSIDER NUDE MODELING

Madeleine Swann had a piece published over at Who Are We Now this week. After reading it, I’m contemplating breaking some personal boundaries. Read: A Life Model’s View.

BTW, I think the navigation page for Who Are We Now is cool. Here’s a screen shot, but it’s clickable at the site. So simple. So elegant.

who are we now

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[The late night additions follow.]

START PLANNING YOUR OLD AGE

A woman named Monica Lerena stopped by the blog and liked something or other. As is my usual practice, I popped over to her place to show my appreciation. ‘Turns out, she just started her blog, Postcards From the Gutter. While poking around, I was led to this video. I’ve recently picked up my knitting practice again, so it caught my eye.

“‘Kaffeslabberas’ is a knitting club in the Copenhagen neighborhood of Amager. It’s members are female pensioners … This project partners up these ladies with Danish artists and designers, with the intent of creating a connection across generations, through the strengths of craftmanship, diversity and experience.”

I want to be one of these ladies in about 40 years. (Yes, I checked my math. Life is long, if you’re lucky.)

Is it just me, or are Scandinavians fascinating? So familiar and alien at the same time. (Says the Minnesotan, who is 3/4 Norwegian.)

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PREPARE FOR POST-THANKSGIVING-DINNER TORPOR

Juliette, over at Vampire Maman, has come up with an excellent set of suggestions for Thanksgiving movie viewing. Check out: Having Guests for Dinner? Thanksgiving Day Movies with a Bite!

to serve man

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There is no way I’m going to capture every great thing that happens in my personal web, let alone on the wider internet. The posts I feature here just happened to catch my eye. They resonated with me and whatever is going on in my life right now. And they are worth sharing.

‘NetNet

#NetNet

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