The Paranormal Hotel: Knock, knock …

… knock, knock.

I’m just recovering from coming away from a long weekend of working at the paranormal hotel. It’s true, I quit that job months ago, but, when I left, I agreed to occasionally fill in when the owners go on vacation. I’ve known, almost since I quit, that I’d be covering four day-shifts in early May.

I didn’t expect anything particularly dramatic to happen, in the hours between 9 a.m. and 7 p.m. on Mother’s Day weekend, and, mostly, I was right.

Of course it was still hard. Having had many weeks away from that environment, I had nearly forgotten how dreary and hopeless if feels there. Just one day of dealing with the hand-to-mouth existence of the residents and guests drained me.

Knock, knock …

To be fair, I wasn’t at my best. Lately I’ve been having some trouble with absent-mindedness. I’m told it’s a function of my age and stage, and that it will pass, but it pisses me off. When my brain stops cooperating with me, I get cranky.

I’m trying to keep a light tone here, but the truth is that it’s scary when I have these little lapses. They aren’t exactly like what you’re probably imagining right now. Yes, we all have occasional brain spasms when we forget where we left our keys, or drive for a few miles on autopilot without really seeing the road. Usually, these things happen when we are sleep deprived, or upset, or trying to multitask too much. A deliberate deep breath and a good mental shake will clear the mind and allow full functionality to return.

This hormonal stuff is more like being drunk. I know there’s a problem, I can try to shake it off, but sometimes I have to accept there’s going to be a period of a few hours, or even most of a day, when I just can’t trust myself to think clearly, or even perceive accurately.

It’s enough to make some small part of my mind start toying with the idea that I just might be going mad.

The paranormal hotel is a terrible place to be for a woman who distrusts her sanity. People there lie to you. Ineptly, yes, but with absolute conviction that you will believe whatever they concoct. On Saturday, in particular, deception seemed to be the order of the day.

… knock, knock.

Allow me to share some of the versions of reality I heard:

Room 127:

Guest (upon check-in): “I’m supposed to be seeing a doctor tomorrow, but I’m not going to need to do that, because I’ve got an appointment in an hour with a woman who can pray over me and take the tumor away. Isn’t God amazing?”

Me: (Non-committal nod.)

Guest: “So I only need the room for one night, not the two I reserved. It will just be me and my Michael.”

Me: “Not four people? The reservation says you wanted a room with two beds, to accommodate four.”

Guest: “Yes, that’s right, but just one person. I like to lay my stuff out on the second bed.”

Me: “Two people then; just you and a Michael?”

Guest: “He’s my kitty cat.”

Me: “Oh. I’m so sorry, but we don’t allow pets in the hotel.”

Guest: “He’s my service animal. And he’s so good, he always uses his litter box.” (She goes on for a while about the cat.)

Me: “He sounds lovely. I’ll just need to see his papers then.”

Guest: (Absolutely blank stare.) “Umm. They are somewhere in my luggage, and I have to get to that appointment, so I can’t get them for you now. I’ll find them for you later. If you’re still here. When is your shift over?”

Me: “Ma’m, I’m sorry, but I can’t let him in until I see his papers–”

Guest: “But he won’t make any mess.”

Me: “It’s not that. It’s a matter of inoculations and health codes.

Guest: “He has his shots. I don’t understand why hotels don’t welcome a nice clean cat like Michael.

Me: Hotels are legally required to accommodate service animals, but when it comes to pets, they are trying to avoid allergens–”

Guest: “Oh, he’s a Turkish angora, so he’s hypoallergenic.”

Me: (In my head.) Well that’s just not true. You know this, Renae. You raised purebreds when you were a little girl, and you know a hell of a lot about cats. There’s no such thing as a hypoallergenic cat, really, and a Turkish Angora is NOT on the list of lower-allergen breeds

Guest: “It IS true!” (My face must have shown what I was thinking–which is another sign that I’m not operating at my best.) “I’ve read lots of articles on The Internet.” (I could hear the capitals in her voice.)

I like cats. The paranormal hotel used to accept pet guests, and only really changed its policy because a large dog did some major damage. Plus, I was only filling in for a few shifts. I judged the situation to be not worthy of a fight. I checked her in and warned her that she’d have to show the papers to whomever was at the desk when she returned.

What happened later:

When I cam back the next day, I was told she never produced papers, claimed that she was leaving the cat in the car overnight, then had the inexperienced girl who was covering the early morning shift carry the cat from the hotel room to her car when she checked out. Apparently the cat sprayed on most of the upholstered furniture.

Knock, knock…

Room 343, 410, 112:

Guest(s): “I’m waiting for my friend to bring me some money. I absolutely have to stay here again tonight, because (fill in the blank.) I know I agreed to check out at 11:00, but he/she will be here before noon. I promise I’ll come right down as soon as I have the money.”

What happened later:

They each delayed as long as possible with frequent promises that it would only be a few more minutes until they could pay, then were just gone when I went to clear them out at 12:45 p.m. As far as I can tell, they were in no way affiliated with each other; that’s just the way people are at the paranormal hotel.

knock, knock.

The laundry room:

As the housekeepers strip each room, they gather the dirty linens into a bundle, then toss the bundle down a chute that descends through all five stories of the hotel. The bundles end up in an industrial sized bin in the laundry room. Part of my job is to stand at the bottom of that chute and sort the laundry into loads. Staff members are supposed to shout “clear” before they drop a bundle down the chute, but sometimes they forget to do it.

I can forgive that.

On Saturday morning, I had just spent four or five minutes in the quiet laundry room, emptying the bin. I was bent into it, fetching out a few loose towels from its bottom, when I heard a trap door from somewhere far above me open. I didn’t have enough time to get out of the way before a heavy, wet bundle dropped onto the back of my neck.

It hurt. I swore. In a clearly annoyed voice, I shouted up the chute, “Hello?” There was no response. I thought, You scared him or her. Watch your cranky level, Renae. Then, Well, at least now it shouldn’t happen again today.

Later, the guy who had been helping out by stripping rooms for the housekeepers came up to me, his sky-blue eyes wide with sincerity, and said, “You didn’t hear me when I shouted clear. Good thing it was a light load, huh?”

An apology from him would have been followed by one from me, for snapping. His words, though, left me speechless. I had to wonder if I was going crazy. Maybe I had missed his warning, even though the machines hadn’t been running yet. Maybe it had been a small, dry load, but my neck was still sore from the blow I’d received. Then I remembered another encounter I’d had with him.

What happened before:

The guy lives at the paranormal hotel, of course. He and his wife have a habit of narrating the world to be as they prefer it to be. They are convinced that they are good liars, too.

Once, they found a very expensive bottle of liquor in a room and appropriated it for themselves. (This doesn’t bother me much. I can see how they could have considered it a gratuity.) I didn’t know about the cognac until the guest who had left the bottle behind came looking for it. When I contacted the couple to see if either of them had found it, they told me they’d thrown it out, and that they’d fetch it from the dumpster for me. (It’s common to find liquor at the hotel, by the way, and it’s standard practice to bring it to the laundry room in case a guest returns for it. Usually, though, it’s  a half-case of cheap beer.)

Eventually they brought the bottle to the front desk, in pristine condition, with its contents intact. The husband regaled me with how he had to climb into the dumpster and move bags until he found it. He also let me know he’d washed it off in his bathroom before bringing it to me. The couple was anxious to tell me that they had no idea it was valuable because they don’t drink ever.

But back to the stories from Saturday.

Knock, knock …

Room 317:

Guest (on the phone, at about 11 a.m.): “Can I get a noon checkout?”

Me: I’m sorry, we are booked up for later today, so we need to get the housekeepers into the rooms as soon as possible. I can give you until 11:30 though. Will that help?”

Guest: “Yes. I’ll have time for a quick shower then. I really appreciate that, and I’ll try to hurry. Thank you.”

What happened later:

Just before noon I called all the rooms that hadn’t yet checked out, (including 317,) in preparation for my first sweep of the hotel. This is standard routine. When the phone is unanswered, it’s an indication that the guests have probably left. Once I’ve noted all the rooms that are likely empty, I go check each one in person, by first knocking, then–assuming there is no response–opening the door with my pass key to confirm the room is empty. Once I’ve visited all the rooms in this way, I can give the maids an update on where they can go next.

When I got to room 317, I knocked, then slid my pass key into the lock and tried to open the door. I immediately hit the security bar which can only be fastened from the room’s interior. I let the door close, then called the room with the portable phone I was carrying. I heard it ring five or six times before the same woman I’d given the 11:30 checkout to answered. Her voice was groggy. I told her it was now past noon, and she’d agreed to leave by 11:30.

She said she’d never spoken to me. I didn’t argue; I just told her she had to vacate the room as soon as possible.

When she finally cleared the room, after 12:30 p.m., she left a wad of foil-lined paper and some food scraps in the microwave with the timer set to maximum.

… knock, knock.

Room 432:

432 was another of the rooms I had called just before noon. There had been no answer, so I had every reason to believe it was vacant. By the time I got to the fourth floor, however, I had run into several rooms that were still occupied, despite the unanswered calls, (including 317, above, where the security bar had been engaged.) When I came to 432, I was a little gun shy. I rapped firmly on the door

Knock, knock.

then paused to listen carefully.

… knock, knock.

From inside the room someone rapped back. It was a soft sound, but distinct. I looked up and down the hall, in case someone was knocking at another room, but I was alone. I tried again and got the same response. My cordless doesn’t always work well above the third floor, but I dialed the room anyway. The phone behind the door rang ten times as I strained to hear any movement beyond the door, but all was silent, save for the rings.

I tucked the phone into my back pocket and tried again, this time with a louder, triple strike

Knock. Knock. Knock.

which was promptly returned.

… knock, knock, knock.

It occurred to me that maybe someone was messing with me deliberately. I checked my occupancy list and found that the rooms on either side of  432 were empty — one had been so all night, and the other had checked out earlier, by turning in their keys to me. Again, I looked up and down the hallway. I paged through the papers on my clipboard. Telling myself it must be an echo, or a sound coming up from the floor below, I raised my had to knock one more time, but I didn’t have the chance. From inside the room came an impatient-sounding

KNOCK. KNOCK! (Pause.) KNOCK!

It’s my job to open that door, no matter what I think I might see or not see, so I did.

empty hotel room by Renae Rude

What’s going to happen now:

I think it’s best for me to avoid the hotel until I have a little more confidence in my ability to perceive things are they really are. It’s bad enough when the residents and guests are lying to me, but when the hotel itself gets in the game, I’m out … at least temporarily.

Because such is life at:

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Interview with Hunter Shea: on THE WAITING and the true-life ghost-story that inspired the novella.

The Waiting Hunter Shea True Ghost StoryAs promised (and just under the wire) I present part one of my interview with Hunter Shea. This segment focuses on his latest release, the novella THE WAITING … and the true-life experiences of the author which inspired the ghost story.

Grab a favorite beverage (we chose to drink pale ale during the interview) and join us for the next 17 minutes or so. Then hit us with any questions or comments you have below.

By the way, we managed to not spoil the book’s ending, so don’t worry if you haven’t read it yet.

The Waiting is available for instant download, for just $2.66 right now, on Amazon.

Go buy it.


‘NetNet: secret dungeon, Victorian cemetery, “giant” crab-monster, true ghost story with pic, horror / dark fiction writer & reader, and Flowers in the Attic.

EXPLORE A SECRET DUNGEON

One of my most frequent dream themes is finding a previously undiscovered room (or rooms) in the house where I live. I can’t vouch that the following story is true, but it’s SO cool if it is. Read: This Guy Moved Into a New Apartment Only to Find Something Weird Yet Amazing… (It’s really one big picture on a meme site, so I can’t share a peek.) Click though. It’s sorta awesome.

*****

LEARN ABOUT A BEAUTIFUL VICTORIAN-ERA CEMETERY & ITS BEES

I love that Deborah DeLong, keeper of the Romancing the Bee blog, often connects gardening and beekeeping with darker, but still beautiful, things. Read: Spring Grove Cemetery – The Victorian Way of Death.

spring-grove-6

*****

WATCH AN ACCIDENTAL / NATURAL HORROR SHORT FILM

I am reminded of every giant-monster movie I’ve ever seen.

*****

READ A TRUE GHOST STORY, COMPLETE WITH PHOTO!

Here’s a real friend of a friend story: Matthew Alan Bennett has this neighbor, see … oh just go read: Paranormal Wednesday – girl in the window.

girl-in-the-window

*****

HORROR WRITER, MEET READER

Emily Einolander writes about beer and movies over at Craft Fear. This essay about what she gets out of horror caught my eye. Read, Why Just Eat Chicken When You Can Be One?

emily

*****

READER, MEET HORROR DARK FICTION WRITER

Joanna Parypinski just made a subtle change to her blog header info; she changed the tagline to read “author of dark fiction” instead of “author of horror fiction.”  I found the thoughts that led her to make the change interesting … and familiar. I’ve been thinking along the same lines myself since the new year came on. Read: Why I Write Dark Fiction.

book cover pandora

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REMINISCE ABOUT A NOVEL YOU PROBABLY READ BEFORE YOU SHOULD HAVE

Scoobyclue took me back to the days of my early adolescence with her piece on the wonderful/terrible Flowers in the Attic. Read: Back to the Attic. Then tell me, how old were you when you read it? (And did any of you “boys” ever read it?)

flowersinside

*****

START A NEW HOBBY: PARTICIPATE IN #HAUNTEDPHOTOAWEEK

I know. It’s a shameless plug for my own project. But it’s gonna be so much fun! Keep an eye out for creepy / eerie photo ops; play with photo editors (if you like.) Then bring the results to one of the galleries. Click the pic for more info.

hauntedphotoaweek

PS: Thanks, Tim Prasil, for this beauty – the first official submission to #hauntedphotoaweek:

hpaw tim prasil hawk

#haunting #hauntedphotoaweek

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There is no way I’m going to capture every great thing that happens in my personal web, let alone on the wider internet. The posts I feature here just happened to catch my eye. They resonated with me and whatever is going on in my life right now. And they are worth sharing.

‘NetNet

#NetNet

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‘NetNet: True haunted house tale, new scary short films, old eerie short films, a quote hunt, a Robert McCammon short story, Gone With the Wind, and TV updates.

READ ANOTHER TRUE HAUNTED HOUSE STORY

haunted_house

Ghosts & Ghouls has posted another good first-person account of a haunting. Of course I can’t verify the story, but I do try to find well-written, plausible tales to share with you. Reader Submission: Life in a Haunted House fits the bill.

*****

VIEW AN EXPERTLY CURATED SET OF SCARY SHORT VIDEOS.

Eva Halloween, who features a short horror video at her blog almost every Friday night, has picked out 5 favorites. Read:  Friday Night Features: Our Top 5 Horror Shorts of 2013.

*****

READ A McCAMMON SHORT STORY

Robert McCammon has gifted us with a fresh short story called White. Get the link to the story, or to EPUB (for Nook) or MOBI (for Kindle) at his post: Kick the New Year off with a new short story by Robert McCammon!

robert mccammon

*****

RECONSIDER A CLASSIC BOOK

I’ve recently started following an (often) irascible teacher at the blog Infinitefreetime. I always enjoy his style, but this post in particular drew me in. Since reading it, I’ve found myself thinking I should re-read Gone With the Wind with an adult’s eyes and awareness. Read: In which I don’t like liking things.

gone

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APPRECIATE THE SENSIBILITIES OF A UNIQUE BLOGGER

Madeleine Swann finds the coolest stuff.

There are four more selections over at: The eerie and enchanting world of early cinema. (I just love that title.)

*****

TRACK DOWN THE ORIGINS OF THIS FANTASTIC PIECE OF WISDOM

“Watch your thoughts, they become words;
watch your words, they become actions;
watch your actions, they become habits;
watch your habits, they become character;
watch your character, for it becomes your destiny.”

Aside from committing to writing more, I’ve also made resolutions to improve my health and finances in 2014.  (Like most everyone.) In early December, I started hunting for tools to help me achieve this year’s goals, and I think I’ve found a couple of good ones. (Yes, I plan to tell you about them, but that’s for another kind of post entirely.) Today I found the above quote, unattributed, in the wilds of one of those tools. 

I had to hunt it down, of course.

I found my answer at a blog called Quote Investigator. Read about the hotly debated source of the quote in: Watch Your Thoughts, They Become Words; Watch Your Words, They Become Actions (Ralph Waldo Emerson? Lao Tzu? Frank Outlaw? Gautama Buddha? Bishop Beckwaith? Father of Margaret Thatcher?)

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NOW LET’S TALK TV!

One of the things I hate about the holiday season is how my favorite shows go on hiatus.

I’m quite excited that AHS: Coven is coming back on Wednesday the 8th. I’ve been waiting for the upcoming special guest episode since I first met Misty Day in the bayou. (Yes, I suspected it would happen, even back then – ask Ogre.) Anyway, squee aside, here’s the latest teaser:

My other favorite 2013 show, The Blacklist, returns Jan. 13. (The Walking Dead isn’t coming back until Feb. 9th.)

What I’m REALLY excited about, though, is Downton Abbey which will begin its 4th season TOMORROW! (Sunday, Jan. 5th.)

Finally, this is just a heads-up that BATES MOTEL Season 2 will premiere on A&E March 3rd and is expected to have a 10 episode run.


*****

There is no way I’m going to capture every great thing that happens in my personal web, let alone on the wider internet. The posts I feature here just happened to catch my eye. They resonated with me and whatever is going on in my life right now. And they are worth sharing.

‘NetNet

#NetNet

*****


Reblog: A Haunting We Will Go by Pamela Morris

NOTE FROM RENAE: The accidental theme here at the blog this week has become ghosts! You must know how happy that makes me.  In a couple of days I’ll be sharing an updated version of the Courting Creepy Ghost Stories list. In the meantime, enjoy this piece by Pamela Morris.

Pamela Morris Books

What with all the hoopla going on about The Conjuring, (which I have yet to see, btw) and the myriad of ghost hunting shows out there, I figured it was time I shared my own ghostly experiences. It truly makes no difference to me whether others believe in this sort of thing or not. My boyfriend is a total non-believer and I still love him regardless.

The earliest true ghost story I was told came to me from my maternal grandmother, Angeline.  She was visiting friends for the weekend and had been given the spare room to sleep in. This room was used by anyone who came to visit them, including numerous grandchildren. On her first night there, she was preparing for bed. As was her habit, she always read a bit before turning off the light for the night. She was doing just that when the door opened and…

View original post 1,110 more words


When would YOU get the hell out of the house in The Conjuring?

Nearly every haunted house movie begins the same way – a middle-class family invests every penny they have in an old fixer-upper.  There is a married couple, a child (or children,) a cat and/or a dog. There is often (though not always) something a little dysfunctional or unusual about the family. Communication is these families is usually spotty at best. The husband and wife don’t confide in each other. The parents ignore unusual behavior by the kids or the animals, and don’t give credence to anything odd the kids say. The family is full of hope. It’s a brand-new, high-stakes, fresh-start for everyone.

Then bad things start to happen.

Ogre and I just got back from seeing The Conjuring. It’s a great movie in many ways, destined to become a horror classic.

But …

I could not help but ask myself the same question I always do when I see another haunted house movie:

  • When, exactly, would I pack up my shit and get the hell out?

When you’ve see The Conjuring (and I recommend you do if you haven’t) PLEASE come here and tell me when YOU would flee. (Or, at the very least, seek out professional help.)

WARNING: If you click the following (READ THE REST OF THIS PAGE) link, you will see a detailed list of scary events that happen to the Perron family, leading up to the moment when they contact the Warrens.

SPOILERS!SPOILERS!SPOILERS!SPOILERS!SPOILERS!SPOILERS!SPOILERS!SPOILERS!SPOILERS!SPOILERS!

movie poster the conjuring

Read the rest of this entry »


Paranormal investigation video #1, part 1 – Room 217

I’ve been stricken with the flu since Saturday, but I’m feeling much better. Tonight, I return to work at the paranormal hotel. I’ll work tomorrow too, and maybe venture back to the gym for a nice gentle treadmill walk.

If you follow @RRudeParanormal, you already know that my first trip to our brand new health club on Friday evening delayed my realization that I had the flu. The confusion was compounded by my decision to spend all of Friday night writing … and consuming far too much coffee and too many cigarettes. When I woke Saturday morning, feeling awful, I thought I knew what was going on. I “cleverly” tweeted: Gave myself pseudo-flu. First made body aches @ gym. Then stayed up all night smoking. Voila: fatigue, burning eyes, sore throat & cough. 

Having thus appropriately mocked myself, I went about my day.

Halfway through my regular shift at the hotel that night, I found myself sprawled on the floor in the office annex, out of sight of any cameras or guests. It was a long, surreal night. (I don’t do fevers well.) And it’s been a long week. Somewhere in that time, there was a trip to a nice doctor who gave me a miraculous slip of paper that said I shouldn’t go to work, or be near anyone. Mostly I’ve been sleeping (and aching and coughing and sneezing and taking dangerously hot baths) but I did put the finishing touches on the following video.

Back in January, my husband and I spent a few hours practicing our paranormal investigation skills in room 217 at the old hotel. We made many mistakes, forgot to do half of what we intended, and had a great time together.

.

Right now, I’m working on the EVP session that begins just as this video ends. I’ve been shocked to see that no one is posting the kind of EVP video that I want to see – the kind that shows the waveform / sonograph of the suspected EVP right in the video. Turns out, that isn’t as easy to do as I assumed it would be. I’ll figure it out, but it’s going to take a little time and tech. Though it would be easy to spend more hours tweaking part one, It’s time to move on. Before I become immersed in part two, I thought I’d share a few things I’ve learned so far:

  • Practice using your intended investigation tools more than you think you need to – they will be uncooperative when it’s dark, and there’s a camera recording your every hesitation.
  • Don’t think you can ad-lib your way through missing props or non-functional tools. Have a backup plan.
  • Don’t forget the tripod.
  • Wear contacts if you have to. Glasses are distracting in night vision.
  • If you’re over 40, try to avoid profile shots.
  • Wear dark, matte clothing. The glowing shirt I’m wearing is just a pastel, cotton, button-up.
  • Expect that EVERYTHING you record could end up in the final cut – “orbs” don’t wait for you to be ready.
Palmer House- Sauk Centre, MN by Francisco Daumhttp://www.flickr.com/photos/franciscodaum/

Palmer House- Sauk Centre, MN by Francisco Daum
http://www.flickr.com/photos/franciscodaum/

We’re planning a trip to the infamous Palmer House this April. Maybe, by then, I’ll be ready.