#NetNet: Mystical dreams, clowns, true ghost stories, ghost shows, and ghost movie reviews.

ADOPT HISTORICAL SLEEP PATTERNS TO HAVE MORE MYSTICAL DREAMS 

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The Little Orphan’s Dream from Boston Public Library https://www.flickr.com/photos/boston_public_library/11454653505/

From T. M. Luhrmann at nytimes.com

To Dream in Different Cultures

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MEET ARTIST JURY THE CLOWN

elephants by Jury the Clown # 12 chuckles by Jury the Clown

From Mitch Lavender at Life in 64 Square Feet:

A Couldrophobic Talks About Jury the Clown — Painted Dollar Art

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READ ANOTHER GOOD CREEPY TRUE GHOST STORY

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From Christy at Ghosts & Ghouls

Reader Submission: Evil At Home

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SUPPORT A DOCUMENTARY OF PARANORMAL WISCONSIN

Jessica Freeburg, children’s writer and paranormal investigator, recently contacted me about a paranormal investigation project that is currently seeking funding on INDIEGOGO.  After checking into it, and watching a 30-minute webisode, I am intrigued. In the spirit of being a good neighbor (Jessica is from Minnesota, and the film’s subject is paranormal Wisconsin) I thought I’d share some information:

Haunted State: Whispers of History Past is a unique documentary about the state of Wisconsin that has never before been told. The film focuses on the history and folklore surrounding the state, seeking to answer questions that have been asked for generations …

With a scheduled release for fall 2014, the crew is currently running an IndieGoGo campaign to help fund the final phase of production.  “This money will help cover things like insurance, permits and travel expenses.  Right now, we’ve got a good movie.  We want a great movie,” said Michael Brown, the film’s Executive Producer. Take a peek at their website www.hauntedstate.com for more details and information the film, or go directly to their IndieGoGo page at https://www.indiegogo.com/projects/haunted-state-whispers-from-history-past/x/7256993 to see how you can become a part of this innovative historical, paranormal film!

Here’s the short trailer for the project, to whet your appetite.

The following 30-minute webisode, however, is what really drew me in. I appreciated the enthusiastic but respectful personality of Michael, who conducts an interesting spirit box session at about the 10-minute mark. I’m also impressed with the captured EVPs.

Check out the INDIEGOGO project:

Haunted State: Whispers from History Past

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MOURN A FAD THAT WE ALL WOULD HAVE LOVED

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From Patrick Keller at The Big Séance:

Dr. Silkini’s Ghost Show: Do the Dead Return? Spooks Sit Beside You!

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READ THE REVIEW THAT INSPIRED ME TO ADD A FEATURE TO MY MOST POPULAR BLOG POST

I think you all know that I don’t often do standard reviews of books and movies here at The Paranormalist. Yes, I have my Courting Creepy Movie Lists, but in them I really only provide a teaser or snippet, my personal reason for recommending the film, and  a link to IMDb (or a similar source) so that interested readers can read plot summaries and full-length synopses if they want.

It works.

Today, though, I read a review of  The Haunting (1963) at one of your blogs that made me think, “Ayup. That’s exactly right. I couldn’t have said it better myself.”  That’s when I realized there’s no reason that I can’t link my movies recommendations to reviews written by my blogging peers. (After all, some of you specialize in that art.)

movie poster the haunting

The Haunting  happens to rank high on: The 13 most haunting films, for ghost story lovers (and another 13+ worth watching.) Because this is my most popular post, I think it’s the perfect list to host this idea.

The haunting films list is due to be updated, so I’ll start adding review links when I tackle that task. You don’t have to wait until the revamp to see what kind of review I particularly like though … go see an example now:

From Scholar* at The Angry Scholar:

Retro Review: The Haunting (1963)

*I do actually know his name, but I learned it AFTER we’d communicated a fair bit, so he will always be Scholar in my mind.

IF YOU HAPPEN TO HAVE A REVIEW (OF ONE OF THE MOVIES ON THIS LIST) HIDDEN AWAY ON YOUR BLOG, DROP A LINK BELOW!

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If I agree with your assessment of the film (or if your piece provides an interesting opposing view) I may link it.

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There is no way I’m going to capture every great thing that happens in my personal web, let alone on the wider internet. The posts I feature here just happened to catch my eye. They resonated with me and whatever is going on in my life right now. And they are worth sharing.

‘NetNet

#NetNet

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Dreaming of a hypnotist clown.

I had the most wonderful nightmare – one too long and involved to relate in full because … well, because they always are, aren’t they? An aspect of it, though, has been niggling at me all evening. My attention may be partially on the movie (Sometimes They Come Back) I’m streaming from Netflix, but, in truth, mostly I’ve been surfing the web, looking at hundreds of images of clowns.

My dream, you see, ended abruptly in the middle of an encounter with an intriguing haunted house performer: a clown / hypnotist.

[For an interesting look at the perils of working as a haunted house performer, check out this post at Huffington Post’s Weird News.]

gangster clown photo

I want to give proper credit for this photo, but can’t find the artist info. I had to use it though, because it’s the closest approximation of my dream clown that I could find.

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He was beautiful in a way that isn’t to my usual taste – small, dark, wiry and of some indeterminate, but fully adult, age. His eyes were his most striking feature – with amber-brown irises which had the clear depth of a sunlit pond. He wore a shabby tailcoat, done up in a faded orange and yellow fabric which would have been better suited to upholstering a ’70s era chair. Under the coat, he wore a dirt-smudged, cream-colored Henley shirt and jeans – modern clothes which nonetheless invoked early 20th century carny garb. An untrimmed peacock feather was tucked into the water-stained, citrus-toned ribbon band on his fedora. His makeup was minimal – just a suggestion of traditional paint.

Guiding my group through his tunnel-like section of the fun house, he seemed to take an interest in me, and I caught him marking the hem of my jacket with chalk. When we emerged from the tunnel into a room lined with large, spinning spirals, he launched into a hypnotist’s patter. I deliberately led him to believe I’d be a good target for his schtick – even though I was certain I was unhypnotizable.

Meaning to play along, I was surprised when he was able to partially mesmerize me – a fact I became aware of when I realized he was causing me to have hallucinations even as he thought he was failing to affect me. When I didn’t cooperate he shifted his attention to someone else. I sensed he was embarrassed – perhaps even feeling duped – as he struggled to refocus the crowd on another mark.

I was left to come out of my semi-trance on my own. When my head finally cleared, he was gone. I felt guilty. Amazed that he had been able to affect me at all, I wanted to congratulate him and apologize for making him look bad. I went back to the beginning of his section, but a different clown was waiting at the entrance to the tunnel. Disappointed, I scanned the crowd, but failed to locate him. I was about to leave when I heard his voice bidding the replacement clown a good night. His face was devoid of paint and he had stripped out of the tailcoat and hat, but I recognized his eyes. I realized, then, that I must have been been disoriented for far longer than the few minutes I had thought.

Pocket watch with chain

As he swept past, I reached out to stop him. It was too loud for him to hear my apology. I pulled him toward a nearby bench, suddenly convinced I had need of his skill in a paranormal investigation I was conducting. I was about to explain exactly what I needed to him when I woke up.

It’s bugging me. What use would a hypnotist be in a ghost hunt? There’s gotta be a story in there somewhere.

Facts to guide the discussion:

  • I am not sensitive to clowns; I neither fear them nor particularly enjoy them.
  • I do not believe I can be hypnotized. And I’m not sure if I believe the phenomena is real for anyone.
  • The early part of the dream was more traditionally nightmare-ish: fleeing a murderous psycho, a “real” haunted house (as opposed to a fun house), etc. All very exciting.

Let the psychoanalysis begin 🙂

This is a detail of an Emmett Kelly portrait, painted by D. L. Rust. (I’ve linked the picture to the artist’s gallery site.) Rust also paints some awesome pin-up girls. (Check out the ‘Artist’s Choice’ tab.)