Horror, Thriller, and Dark Fantasy Movies at the Oscars, Part Two.

Last week I shared a list of horror, thriller, and dark fantasy movies that were acknowledged at the Academy Awards prior to 1992. (And the list shows that the academy is not as stingy about honoring “our” genre as water cooler chit-chat might suggest.)

If you’re a dark movie fan, you probably already know the significance of 1992, but if you’ve forgotten, I’ll give you a hint:

Okay. That was a big hint.

The Silence of the Lambs (1991) was the third film in the history of the awards to win the Big Five: best picture, best director, best actress, best actor, and best screenwriting. (The other two films that accomplished this feat were It Happened One Night (1934) and One Flew Over the Cuckoo’s Nest (1975).)

Here are its stats:

1992 The Silence of the Lambs

  • Winner of Best Picture
  • Winner of Best Director
  • Winner of Best Writing, Screenplay Based on Material Previously Produced or Published
  • Winner of Best Actor in a Leading Role
  • Winner of Best Actress in a Leading Role
  • Nominated for Best Sound
  • Nominated for Best Film Editing

(If you didn’t catch it last week, you ought to take a peek at how well Hitchcock’s Rebecca did in 1941. It actually garnered more nominations than SotL.)

Since The Silence of the Lambs so emphatically broke through the perceived barrier to acclaim, many of our favorite movies have been given a nod. This is what the record looks like:

Horror, Thriller and Dark Fantasy Movies

Honored at The Academy Awards Since Silence of the Lambs

(also in) 1992 The Addams Family

  • Nominated for Best Costume Design

1993 Bram Stoker’s Dracula

  • Winner of Best Costume Design
  • Winner of Best Effects, Sound Effects Editing
  • Winner of Best Makeup
  • Nominated for Best Art Direction – Set Decoration

1994 Addams Family Values

  • Nominated for Best Art Direction – Set Decoration

1995 Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein

  • Nominated for Best Makeup

1995 Interview With the Vampire

  • Nominated for Best Art Direction – Set Decoration
  • Nominated for Best Music, Original Score

1999 Gods and Monsters

  • Winner of  Best Writing, Screenplay Based on Material Previously Produced or Published
  • Nominated for Best Actor in a Leading Role: Ian McKellen
  • Nominated for Best Actress in a Supporting Role: Lynn Redgrave
  • (Also winner of Bram Stoker Award – Superior Achievement in Screenplay, tied with Dark City. See below.)

2000 The Green Mile

  • Nominated for Best Picture
  • Nominated for Best Actor in a Supporting Role: Michael Clarke Duncan
  • Nominated for Best Writing, Screenplay Based on Material Previously Produced or Published
  • Nominated for Best Sound
  • (Also nominated for Bram Stoker Award – Superior Achievement in Screenplay)

2000 The Sixth Sense

  • Nominated for Best Picture
  • Nominated for Best Director: M. Night Shyamalan
  • Nominated for Best Writing, Screenplay Written Directly for the Screen
  • Nominated for Best Actor in a Supporting Role: Haley Joel Osment
  • Nominated for Best Actress in a Supporting Role: Toni Collette
  • Nominated for Best Film Editing
  • (Also winner of Bram Stoker Award – Superior Achievement in Screenplay)

2000 Sleepy Hollow

  • Winner of Best Art Direction – Set Decoration
  • Nominated for Best Cinematography
  • Nominated for Best Costume Design

2001 The Cell

  • Nominated for Best Makeup
  • (Also nominated for Bram Stoker Award – Superior Achievement in Screenplay)

2001 Shadow of the Vampire

  • Winner of Best Makeup
  • Nominated for Best Actor in a Supporting Role: Willem Dafoe
  • (Also winner of Bram Stoker Award – Superior Achievement in Screenplay)

2007 Pan’s Labyrinth

  • Winner of Best  Cinematography
  • Winner of Best Art Direction
  • Winner of Best Makeup
  • Nominated for Best Writing, Original Screenplay
  • Nominated for Best Music – Original Score
  • Nominated for Best Foreign Language Film of the Year

2008 Sweeney Todd: The Demon of Fleet Street

  • Winner of Best Art Direction
  • Nominated for Best Actor in a Leading Role: Johnny Dep
  • Nominated for Best Costume Design

2011 The Wolfman

  • Winner of Best Makeup

2011 Black Swan

  • Winner of Best Actress in a Leading Role
  • Nominated for Best Picture
  • Nominated for Best Director
  • Nominated for Best Cinematography
  • Nominated for Best Film Editing

Next week, I’ll share a list of horror and dark fantasy films that Oscar (wrongly?) ignored in the years between 1993 and the present.

In case you’re wondering, yes, I’m annoyed by some of the exclusions — 2002 and 2015, for example, were painful.

(PS: I already have half of next Monday’s post written, because I got a bit carried away once I started looking at the films that did not get any love from Oscar. I gotta pull the trigger for today though, so I’ve decided to stop here for now, and save the rest of today’s research for next week. I’ll talk more about the Bram Stoker Award for Screenwriting which I mention above — and probably about the SATURN Awards — then.)

HAVE YOU HEARD ABOUT MOVIEPASS?

Before I go, I want to share something that you can use right now, to see this year’s nominees.

For $9.95 per month, you can see one movie per day, in (almost) any theater, at any time. No film exclusions. No catches. You don’t even have to sign on for a long subscription period. You pay month to month; it’s automatically billed; you can cancel anytime. You need to be able to install an app on your phone, so that you can check-in once you get to the theater. MoviePass then authorizes a transaction. Next, you walk up to the ticketing window and present a MoviePass card which looks like a normal credit card. The theater processes the card like any other, charging the full cost of a single ticket. This card only pays for the ticket, not for concessions.

I know this sounds too good to be true, but it really, truly works. We signed up about a week and a half ago, got our cards in the mail promptly, and used them this last weekend.

Do you have any idea how much money this is going to save our cinephile family?!?

Go here: https://www.moviepass.com/

(I’m still not entirely clear on how this is a sustainable model, but I’m willing to take advantage for as long as it lasts.)

Also remember that many theaters will have special showings and package deals for the nominees. Check AMC, Cinemark, and Regal. There may be others too.

STATUS OF MY PERSONAL QUEST TO SEE ALL THE NOMINEES:

I have now seen ALL the Best Picture nominees for this year’s  Academy Awards.

Of the nine nominees, I hated two, really liked four, and loved two. If you add that up you’ll see I’m missing one. That’s because one film has me veering from love, through WTF, to hate, and back.

You can see all the trailers here:  http://oscar.go.com/nominees

What have you seen so far, and what do you intend to see before March 4th? What’s you love/like/hate tally?

 

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